Canadian legal cannabis prices nearly 50 percent higher than black market prices

420 INTEL: David Clement, the North American affairs manager for consumer advocacy group Consumer Choice Centre, said that it’s unsurprising that prices of cannabis have risen.     

Clement said that in legalizing marijuana, products are now subject to both federal and provincial taxes in addition to licensing costs and numerous other fees associated with running a cannabis business all the way through the production line to the retailer.

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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

Canada’s Cannabis Prices Increase After Legalization

CULTURE MAGAZINE: “The taxes and fees create prices that are high out of the gate, and then a lack of competition prevents those prices from being slowly pushed down,” said David Clement, the North American affairs manager for the Consumer Choice Center.

The money generated from taxes and licensing go to fund the cannabis program, and Clement told CBC News that they will use an estimated half a billion dollars over the next five years. On top of that, some provinces in Canada have access to legal cannabis only through government-run shop fronts or online retail.

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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

Kanada: Neue Statistiken zeigen Probleme mit dem legalen Cannabis-Markt

Das liege vor allem an den hohen Kosten, die auf legale Unternehmen zukommen. Pro Jahr lägen die Kosten, um den Bestimmungen des Cannabis Act gerecht zu werden, bei mehreren Millionen Dollar, sagte David Clement, Direktor des Consumer Choice Center, gegenüber CBC.

Außerdem ließen Steuern und Gebühren die Preise in die Höhe steigen. Durch die praktisch nicht vorhandene (legale) Konkurrenz könnten sich die Preise dann halten, so Clement.

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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

合法化後供不應求 大麻價格漲逾17%

負監督全球監管政策的消費者權益組織——消費者選擇中心(Consumer Choice Centre)的北美事務經理克萊門特(David Clement)表示,大麻價格上漲很正常,有兩個主要因素推高了大麻成本:稅收和缺乏競爭。

克萊門特表示,合法就代表要繳納省稅和聯邦稅,加上生產商的許可執照費用和固定開支成本,這些費用都轉嫁給最終用戶。他說:「執行大麻法案中的規則和條例,每年就要花費5億元,政府自然要從許可執照費上獲取收入來彌補開支。」

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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

Price of pot is up since legalization, StatsCan finds

CBC NEWS: David Clement said it’s not surprising that the price of pot has risen. The North American affairs manager for the Consumer Choice Centre, a consumer advocacy group that monitors regulatory policy around the globe, said there are two main factors pushing up cannabis costs — taxes and lack of competition.

The taxes and fees create prices that are high out of the gate, and then a lack of competition prevents those prices from being slowly pushed down.-David Clement, consumer advocate

Now that it’s legal, pot is now subject to provincial and federal taxes, plus all the fees and licensing costs imposed on producers that are passed on to end users, said Clement.

“It costs half a billion [over five years] to enforce the rules and regulations in the Cannabis Act, so in order to generate the revenues to cover that they’ve implemented fees and licences on licensed producers.”Don’t delete your dealer’s number yet — legal cannabis shortage looms

On top of that, access is restricted in the majority of provinces and territories to government-run retail and online shops only.

“The taxes and fees create prices that are high out of the gate, and then a lack of competition prevents those prices from being slowly pushed down,” Clement said.

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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

Canada: le cannabis coûte plus cher depuis sa légalisation

H24: “Il n’est pas surprenant que le prix de l’herbe ait augmenté”, affirme David Clement, directeur des affaires nord-américaines du Consumer Choice Centre, un groupe de défense des consommateurs qui fait une veille réglementaire à l’échelle mondiale. Il estime que deux facteurs principaux font augmenter les coûts du cannabis : les taxes et le manque de concurrence.

Les taxes et les frais créent des prix qui sont élevés (…), et puis un manque de concurrence empêche ces prix d’être lentement poussés à la baisse.

“Il en coûte un demi-milliard par an pour appliquer les règles et règlements de la Loi sur le cannabis, afin de générer les revenus nécessaires pour couvrir les frais et les licences qu’ils ont imposés aux producteurs autorisés”, ajoute M. Clement.

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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

Applications open to enter lottery for 25 retail cannabis licenses in Ontario

One consumer advocacy group criticized the government for its plan to start with just 25 stores.

“The supply issues are real. That is something that consumers are dealing with, the industry is dealing with. … that doesn’t justify a lottery system and it doesn’t justify capping retailers at all,” said David Clement, manager of North American affairs for the Consumer Choice Center.

Clement said he will be watching the results of the lottery closely and was doubtful that all of the companies drawn will be able to meet the quick ramp-up requirements to open their stores by April 1.

“They are faced with heavy fines if they aren’t able to open on time,” he said. “There are some heavy limits and stress testing they are required to meet. Our concerns with some of those criteria is that the province doesn’t treat other businesses that way.”

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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

Ontario cannabis retail applications are now being accepted

“The supply issues are real. That is something that consumers are dealing with, the industry is dealing with … that doesn’t justify a lottery system and it doesn’t justify capping retailers at all,” said David Clement, manager of North American affairs for the Consumer Choice Center.

Clement said he will be watching the results of the lottery closely and was doubtful that all of the companies drawn will be able to meet the quick ramp-up requirements to open their stores by April 1.

“They are faced with heavy fines if they aren’t able to open on time,” he said. “There are some heavy limits and stress testing they are required to meet. Our concerns with some of those criteria is that the province doesn’t treat other businesses that way.”

READ MORE
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About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.

Ontario now accepting applications for cannabis retail licences

THE GLOBE AND MAIL: “The supply issues are real. That is something that consumers are dealing with, the industry is dealing with. … that doesn’t justify a lottery system and it doesn’t justify capping retailers at all,” said David Clement, manager of North American affairs for the Consumer Choice Center.

Mr. Clement said he will be watching the results of the lottery closely and was doubtful that all of the companies drawn will be able to meet the quick ramp-up requirements to open their stores by April 1.

“They are faced with heavy fines if they aren’t able to open on time,” he said. “There are some heavy limits and stress testing they are required to meet. Our concerns with some of those criteria is that the province doesn’t treat other businesses that way.”

READ MORE
mm

About David Clement

David Clement is the North American Affairs Manager for the Consumer Choice Center and is based out of Oakville, Ontario. David holds a BA in Political Science and a MA in International Relations from Wilfrid Laurier University. Previously, David was the Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights. David has been regularly featured on the CBC, Global News, The Toronto Star and various other major Canadian news outlets.