Environment

Open Letter on Climate Change

Open Letter on Climate Change:

Dear Executive Vice-President Timmermans, 

On behalf of the Consumer Choice Center, the consumer advocacy group representing and empowering consumers in the EU and globally, I would like to congratulate you on your appointment. We wholeheartedly share your determination to find the most sustainable and consumer-friendly solution to the climate change dilemma and hope our perspective on the matter would be valuable.

While we welcome your ambition to reduce carbon emissions in Europe by 2050, we also believe that every policy should also be considered through the lens of consumer choice and affordability. The world, as we know it now, wouldn’t be possible if innovation was prevented from running its course and making our lives longer, safer and more prosperous. 

All too often the unlimited potential of innovation to help solve the issue of climate change is dismissed to the detriment of European consumers. Being able to freely choose between a train ride and a flight, or between gene-modified and organic foods is crucial. Well-intended policies tend to fall prey to popular rhetoric turning a blind eye to alternative solutions. The entrepreneurial spirit is an essential part of our European culture, and it’s about time we channeled it into the global fight against climate change.

We should stay united, sensible and considerate in our efforts to tackle climate change. Whereas taxes and bans might seem like good solutions, their direct and tangible impact on consumers and their ability to choose cannot be ignored.

We believe that the key issues the European policymakers should take into account centre around food supply, mobility and energy.

Embracing innovation in agriculture, mobility and energy sectors is a great way to combat climate change.

Agriculture

Agriculture

With the world’s population expected to reach almost ten billion by 2050, and innately limited natural resources facing new environmental challenges, the situation can hardly be regarded as positive. If we look beyond popular solutions, we will find that there are many more ways to approach the issue. Innovation in agriculture is one of them. 

Organic farming is appealing because it’s “natural” and is, therefore, associated with higher food safety, but it can potentially do more harm than good if we choose to stick to it. In 2017, researchers at the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture in Switzerland estimated that if the world chose to fully convert to organic agriculture, we would need between 16 and 81% more land to feed the planet. The overreliance on limited natural resources, as in the case of organic farming, is significantly more dangerous than taxes. 

The European Union has traditionally objected to most innovations in food science and prevented European consumers from accessing biologically-enhanced food. This can be seen in the very limited number of genetically modified crops authorised for cultivation in the EU, and a very cumbersome and expensive process of importing genetically modified food and a recent European Court of Justice ruling against gene editing.

However, there is no substantial scientific evidence of the health and environmental risks ascribed to GM products. With the help of gene engineering, we would be able to decrease our dependence on natural resources and minimise the use of fertilisers and pesticides. Creating drought and heat-tolerant crops would ensure we don’t need to deforest wild areas to free up more land for agricultural purposes.

In order to unleash the potential of gene modification and help it mitigate the environmental challenges we have to face, it is also essential that the EU creates fair and equitable conditions for GMO-free and GM foods.

Under the existing EU legislation, all food which contains greater than 0.9% of approved GMOs must be labeled as such. No such rule exists with regards to foods that are 100% GMO-free, proving that there is explicit discrimination in place giving GMO-free food an unfair advantage on the market. 

Gene modification should excite us as it would allow us to address the issue of climate change in a smart way. 

Our recommendations:

  • Reassess the existing EU regulations on the grounds of potential gains and benefits for the consumer rather than simply based on popularised threats not based in fact.
  • Ensure fair and equitable market conditions for GM and GM-free foods.
Airbus

Mobility

Recently, nine EU finance ministers called for a European aviation tax as a means to cut emissions from flying. Similar schemes, such as a 7-euro EU-wide flight tax, have been suggested in the past, but haven’t had any political success mainly due to the opposition from countries such as Malta, Cyprus and Latvia, Poland, Hungary, Ireland, and Croatia due to the fact that they are hugely dependent on tourism.

Every tax imposed on airlines ends up hurting consumers without solving the climate change dilemma, especially in the long run.

The liberalisation of air travel within Europe and the emergence of low cost carriers and massive competition within the airline industry have allowed millions of European to use planes for either leisure or economic activities.

Economic migrants and commuters from Eastern Europe can visit their families more often and more cities are connected to the rest of the continent. Assuming that European taxes would move more of these travel patterns to rail neglects the realities of European rail networks and actual distances to travel. Passengers flying from Bucharest to Brussels will hardly be able to use buses or trains for this journey.

Saving the environment is as important to airlines as it to each and every one of us. The aviation industry has been making consistent efforts to use less fuel. Giving innovative technologies such as new materials and fuel saving engines a chance doesn’t usually come to mind as a possible solution, while its potential to help us cut the emissions would actually have a significant impact. For example, Airbus’ new A321XLR. has 30% less kerosene consumption per passenger, while adding 30% more range than the currently used A321neo. 

Our recommendation:

  • Do not impose additional taxes on airlines at the expense of European consumers and let innovation take its course.
  • Do not discriminate against existing and well-established technologies such as the internal combustion engine. Technology neutrality has to be maintained in both, type of engine and mode of transportation.
European Council

Energy

There is a wide agreement between policymakers, activists and the public that reducing carbon emissions is key to fighting climate change. Taxing polluters tops the list of the most popular solutions. We, as a consumer group, are concerned that as long as there is no viable and affordable alternative, additional taxation of carbon would only hurt consumers. All carbon taxes are usually passed on to the consumer and thus should be avoided.

As the debate on how to decarbonise Europe carries on, it is about time the discourse stopped turning its back on the astounding advantages of nuclear energy. Aside from being fully carbon-free, nuclear is also one of the safest energy sources. It also keeps the air clean contributing to the overall wellbeing. Between 1995 and 2016, the US could have emitted 14,000 million metric tons of carbon dioxide more without nuclear. 

Popular scepticism surrounding nuclear isn’t backed up scientifically. Multiple studies concluded that the risks of accidents in nuclear plants are low and have been declining. 

Embracing nuclear power will help us address climate change in a sustainable and consumer-friendly fashion. France and Sweden, who now emit less than a tenth of the world average of carbon dioxide per kilowatt-hour, are prime examples of decarbonisation through nuclear. They achieved this by recognising and embracing nuclear power. Opting for nuclear has made France and Sweden “greener” and led to a decrease in the price of electricity. On the other hand, Germany and Denmark, with their over reliance on renewable energy, have the highest energy prices in Europe.

European policymakers ought to provide a framework in which innovation and new technologies can make consumers’ lives easier and more affordable. In order to achieve this, the Commission should embrace technology neutrality instead of trying to predict what technologies would prevail in the future and favouring some above the rest. Effective energy market policies do not pretend to have all the answers: they create fair and equitable market conditions that let consumers and innovators coordinate in the marketplace and achieve their desired goals. 

For the sake of consumer choice and future innovation, European policymakers need to strictly adhere to technology neutrality and not pick winners of contests that are still ahead of us.

Our recommendations:

  • Recognise and embrace the possibilities to reduce carbon emissions by nuclear power.
  • Stay technology neutral and create a fair and equitable environment in which innovators can continue to innovate and compete on the same terms; do not pick winners and losers ahead of time.
  • Do not burden consumers with new taxes on energy.

Throughout history, innovation has always been the key driver of human progress and ever expanding prosperity. Innovation can become the best solution to the climate change issue too.

We are hopeful that European policymakers will choose to embrace the entrepreneurial spirit instead of taking the path of bans and other restrictions. The beauty of consumer-driven innovation is that it comes naturally through the marketplace. Consumers value their ability to choose and creating market conditions under which they are able to switch to more environment-friendly options is crucial.

Fighting climate change might seem like an uphill battle and preserving consumer choice and affordability on this journey is extremely challenging. The EU can become a global pioneer of innovation in agriculture, mobility and energy sectors if we stay united, sensible and considerate in the face of climate change. 

We would be delighted to elaborate further on the suggested policy recommendations.

Sincerely,

Fred Roeder
Managing Director
Consumer Choice Center

Exporter l’agroécologie en Afrique est immoral [Tribune]

Vers la fin du mois de juin, le “World Food Preservation Center”, en coopération avec l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (ONUAA), tiendra la première “Conférence internationale sur l’agroécologie transformant les systèmes agricoles et alimentaires en Afrique”, à Nairobi, Kenya. L’objectif de cette conférence est de promouvoir l’agriculture biologique et non-OGM dans le cadre d’une “transformation socio-économique” complète de l’Afrique. Une réforme malavisée et non-scientifique qui aurait un impact dévastateur dans les parties de l’Afrique en développement qui ont le plus besoin d’innovation.

La fascination pour l’agriculture biologique n’est pas nouvelle. Le gouvernement français augmente les subventions aux exploitations agricoles biologiques dans le but d’atteindre 15% de production bio d’ici 2022. L’Allemagne et le Luxembourg se sont fixés des objectifs de 20% de production biologique d’ici 2025 et 2030 respectivement.

Même la communauté internationale du développement a adhéré au concept, mais elle l’a porté à un tout autre niveau. Dirigés par l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (ONUAA), les programmes de développement et d’aide reposent de plus en plus sur l’adoption de l’agroécologie, qui prend l’agriculture biologique comme point de départ et ajoute une série de théories sociales et économiques visant à réaliser la “transformation totale” de la production agricole, et même la société dans son ensemble.

Selon sa définition originale, l’agroécologie est simplement l’étude des pratiques écologiques appliquées à l’agriculture. Ce qui a commencé comme science, cependant, s’est transformé en une doctrine politique qui non seulement exclut les technologies modernes telles que le génie génétique, les pesticides de dernière génération et les engrais synthétiques, mais qui exalte explicitement les avantages de l’agriculture “paysanne” et “indigène”. Dans de nombreux cas, l’agroécologie décourage même la mécanisation comme moyen de libérer les pauvres, et a une hostilité à l’égard du commerce international.

Il ne faut cependant pas oublier que toutes les “transformations” ne sont pas bonnes. Elles peuvent être également mauvaises, voire catastrophiques. Une étude récente menée par des militants pro-agroécologie a montré que l’application de leurs principes à l’Europe réduirait la productivité agricole de 35% en moyenne. Pour ces activistes, c’est positif, car de toute façon nous mangerions déjà trop en Europe. Il est difficile de voir comment une baisse pareille de la productivité parmi les régions les plus pauvres de cette planète – un pourcentage élevé de personnes souffrent actuellement de malnutrition – pourrait être autre chose qu’une calamité.

Issu d’une famille paysanne, je ne peux qu’être abasourdi à l’idée de débarrasser l’agriculture de la mécanisation. Mes ancêtres ont travaillé plus de 60 heures par semaine de dur labeur manuel et c’est l’agriculture moderne qui a pu les rendre plus productifs et leur donner du temps libre : quelque chose dont ils n’avaient jamais pu profiter auparavant.

Il n’y a rien de mal à pratiquer ce que l’on nomme aujourd’hui l’agriculture paysanne” sur une base purement volontaire, au sein d’une communauté de personnes qui aiment à retrouver un contact avec la nature (et/ou s’infliger de terribles maux de dos). En fait, dans un monde occidental d’agriculture mécanisée, il est même soutenable de voir certaines fermes fonctionner de cette façon (même si cela nécessite des subventions accrues), dans le but de satisfaire une clientèle nostalgique. Cependant, ce qui est vraiment troublant, c’est lorsque des militants de l’agroécologie et des institutions internationales censées se consacrer à la lutte contre la pauvreté sont prêts à déformer la réalité scientifique et à imposer leur idéologie à ceux qui peuvent le moins se le permettre.

La conférence de Nairobi

La conférence qui se tiendra au Kenya est une combinaison de deux événements qui devaient initialement être organisés en même temps. “Conférence de l’Afrique de l’Est sur l’intensification de l’agroécologie et du commerce écologique des produits biologiques” et le “1er Congrès panafricain sur les pesticides synthétiques, l’environnement et la santé humaine”. En parcourant la liste des organisateurs et des participants, il est à noter que les agences, institutions et organisations qui ne soutiennent pas l’agroécologie ou qui ont une véritable position scientifique à propos des herbicides et des OGM, ne seront pas présentes. Apparemment, certaines personnes n’étaient pas censées gâcher la fête.

Et ce sera une fête. Du moins, si l’on croit que la fin justifie le fait de diffuser de fausses informations sur les pesticides et les OGM.

Parmi les orateurs figurent les scientifiques Don Huber et Judy Carmen, qui ont tous deux fait des déclarations non-scientifiques – et tout aussi discréditées – sur les OGM. Tyrone Hayes, qui est célèbre pour son affirmation, maintenant défendue par Alex Jones, le conspirationniste de InfoWars, selon qui l’herbicide atrazine “rend les grenouilles homosexuelles“. Une telle invitation serait discréditante pour toute grande organisation, mais apparemment l’ONUAA/FAO ne semble pas s’en soucier.

Par l’intermédiaire des Nations Unies, ces politiques agroécologiques sont de plus en plus exigées par les organisations gouvernementales internationales et les ONG comme condition pour recevoir des aides financières. Maintenant qu’elle s’étend à l’Afrique, qui a désespérément besoin de mécanisation et de méthodes agricoles efficaces, il faut l’appeler pour ce qu’elle est : de l’activisme anti-science, basé sur des fantasmes écologistes. L’agroécologie, en tant que doctrine politique, n’a pas sa place dans le discours politique fondé sur la science et sa promotion – étant donné les connaissances scientifiques dont nous disposons aujourd’hui – est immorale.

L’Occident peut bien supporter de dépenser des quantités de subventions dans des activités peu productives. Vouloir l’imposer comme modèle dans des pays en voie de développement, où la malnutrition fait des ravages, est criminel.

Read more here

Umweltaktivisten und fragwürdige Methoden

Ende Juni veranstaltet das “World Food Preservation Center” in Zusammenarbeit mit der Welternährungsorganisation der Vereinten Nationen, die erste “International Conference on Agroecology Transforming Agriculture & Food Systems in Africa” in Nairobi, Kenia.

Ziel dieser Konferenz ist es, den ökologischen und gentechnikfreien Landbau im Rahmen einer vollständigen “sozioökonomischen Transformation” Afrikas zu fördern. Klingt verwirrend, und ist es auch. Das technische Wort lautet “Agrarökologie”, und will die Landwirtschaft weltweit komplett umkrempeln. Da die Welternährungsorganisation FAObeteiligt ist, geht es um mehr als nur reine Theorie.

Die Faszination für ökologischen Landbau und Bio-Produkte ist nicht neu. Deutschland hat sich zum Ziel gesetzt, bis 2030 eine Bio-Produktion von 20% zu erreichen. Klimafreundliches Wachstum und ökologische Landwirtschaft waren auch auf der Tagesordnung von Prinz Charles und Camilla, die während eines Bayernbesuchs einen Bio-Bauernhof in Glonn besuchten.

Selbst die internationale Entwicklungsgemeinschaft hat sich dem Konzept angeschlossen – allerdings hat sie es auf eine ganz neue Ebene gehoben. Unter der Leitung der Welternährungsorganisation (FAO) basieren Entwicklungsprogramme und -hilfen zunehmend auf dem ideologischen Prinzip der “Agrarökologie”, die neben biologischem Landbau auch eine Reihe von sozialen und wirtschaftlichen Theorien beinhaltet. Das Ziel: Die komplette Transformation der landwirtschaftlichen Produktion und sogar der Gesellschaft.

Nach ihrer ursprünglichen Definition ist die Agrarökologie schlicht die Untersuchung ökologischer Praktiken in der Landwirtschaft. Was als Wissenschaft begann, hat sich jedoch zu einer politischen Doktrin entwickelt, die nicht nur moderne Technologien wie Gentechnik, Pestizide und synthetische Düngemittel ablehnt, sondern ausdrücklich die Vorteile der “bäuerlichen” und “einheimischen” Landwirtschaft lobt. In vielen Fällen werden auch Mechanisierung internationaler Handel abgelehnt.

Es bedarf keinem Historiker um zu verstehen, dass nicht alle Transformationen gut sind. Eine aktuelle Studie von Befürwortern der Agrarökologie ergab, dass die Anwendung ihrer Prinzipien auf Europa die landwirtschaftliche Produktivität im Durchschnitt um 35 % verringern würde. Für die Aktivisten ist das positiv, da die Europäer ihrer Meinung nach ohnehin zu viel essen. Es ist schwer zu erraten, wie ein Rückgang der Produktivität um 35 % – im Anbetracht der großen Anzahl an Menschen, die momentan an Hunger leider – alles andere als eine Katastrophe wäre.

Als jemand aus einer Familie, die bis zum Ende des letzten Weltkriegs Bauern waren, kann ich über die Idee, die Landwirtschaft von Mechanisierung zu befreien nur den Kopf schütteln. Meine Vorfahren arbeiteten 60 Stunden lang in schwerster Feldarbeit, und nur die moderne Landwirtschaft erlaubte ihnen produktiver zu werden und etwas Freizeit zu genießen.

Es ist nichts falsch daran, “bäuerliche Landwirtschaft” auf rein freiwilliger Basis in einer Gemeinschaft von Menschen zu betreiben, die es genießen, eins mit der Natur zu sein . In der Welt der mechanisierten Landwirtschaft ist es sogar hilfreich, wenn einige Betriebe auf diese Weise arbeiten, um nostalgische Kunden zufrieden zu stellen. Wirklich beunruhigend ist jedoch, wenn Agrarökologie-Aktivisten und internationale Institutionen, die sich angeblich der Armutsbekämpfung widmen, bereit sind, die wissenschaftliche Realität zu verzerren und ihre Ideologie denen aufzuzwingen, die sie sich am wenigsten leisten können.

Die Kenia Konferenz

Die Konferenz in Kenia im Juni ist eine Kombination aus zwei Veranstaltungen, die ursprünglich gleichzeitig stattfinden sollten. “The Eastern Africa Conference on Scaling up Agroecology and Ecological Organic Trade” und die “1st All Africa Congress on Synthetic Pesticides, Environment, and Human Health”. Wenn man durch die Liste der Organisatoren und Teilnehmer blättert, ist es bemerkenswertest, dass Agenturen, Institutionen und Organisationen, die die Agrarökologie nicht unterstützen oder eine wissenschaftliche Sichtweise auf Herbizide und GVO (genetisch veränderte Organismen) haben, nicht anwesend sein werden. Anscheinend will man die Feier nicht mit wissenschaftlichen Debatten stören.

Einer der Referenten auf der Konferenz ist Gilles-Eric Séralini, ein französischer Biologe und Anti-GVO-Aktivist. Er ist bekannt für seine Studie aus dem Jahr 2012, in der er behauptet, dass Ratten, die mit gentechnisch verändertem Mais gefüttert wurden, eine größere Anfälligkeit für Tumore verzeichneten. Was folgte, prägte die “Séralini-Affäre”, bei der verschiedene Regulierungsbehörden und Wissenschaftler die Studie wegen tiefer methodischer Mängel ablehnten. Die Studie wurde später zurückgezogen, und vier aktuelle Studien (drei von der EU und eine von der französischen Regierung finanziert) haben die Seralini-These nun vollends widerlegt.

Weitere Redner sind die Wissenschaftler Don Huber und Judy Carmen, die beide ähnlich widerlegte Behauptungen über GVO aufgestellt haben. Hinzu kommt Tyrone Hayes, der für seine Behauptung berühmt ist dass das Herbizid Atrazin, in eigenen Worten, “Frösche schwul macht”. Diese Behauptung wurde durch die (widerlegte) Hayes-Studie stetig vom amerikanischen Verschwörtungstheoretiker Alex Jones, der kürzlich von Facebook gebannt wurde, vertreten.

Die FAO nimmt trotz der wissenschaftlichen Fragen in Sachen Agrarökologie und der fragwürdigen Redner wohl am Ende doch an der Konferenz teil. Dass letztere in Kenia stattfindet, ein Land das dringenden Bedarf an effizienterer Landwirtschaft hat, muss hinterfragt werden. Wenn sich nämlich herausstellt, dass staatliche Gelder in eine ideologisch geprägte Stillstandspolitik in Afrika geflossen sind, und Menschen dadurch zu Schaden gekommen sind, dann muss irgendjemand die Verantwortung übernehmen.

Read more here

Les jeunes manifestants pour le climat seront les gilets jaunes de demain

Depuis des mois, les jeunes marcheurs pour le climat s’emparent de l’Europe. Leurs récentes déclarations nous montrent ce qu’ils veulent vraiment – et c’est exactement ce qu’on pensait.

Ces derniers temps, difficile d’ignorer dans la presse les nombreuses images de grandes manifestations en faveur de “l’action pour le climat”. On y trouve notamment les signes les plus drôles que tiennent de jeunes lycéens, incitant les politiciens à adopter des actions inspirantes.

Jusqu’à présent, ce que les marcheurs du climat espéraient réellement réaliser n’était pas tout à fait clair.

Pour la plupart, les activistes déplorent simplement que les politiciens et les riches restent les bras croisés alors que la planète tend vers son inévitable effondrement, prévu pour dans 12 ans.

Leur symbole : Greta Thunberg, élève de secondaire de 16 ans, qui a initié le mouvement avec sa “grève scolaire” pour le climat.

Mais à l’approche de ses 18 ans, âge officiellement requis pour se présenter aux élections législatives en Suède, son pays d’origine, il lui est désormais crucial d’avoir un programme politique clair. La question est : que faire exactement contre la catastrophe climatique ?

Ces jeunes gens voudront commencer “doucement”, en exigeant simplement que toutes les émissions de carbone cessent immédiatement. Un exemple ? Annuler l’expansion vitale de l’aéroport de Copenhague, dont la jeune fille suédoise parle dans un tweet.

tweet de Greta Thunberg

“L’erreur la plus dangereuse que l’on puisse faire quant à la crise climatique est peut-être de penser que nous devons ‘réduire’ nos émissions. Parce que c’est loin de suffire. Nos émissions doivent cesser si nous voulons rester sous les 1,5/2° de réchauffement. Cela exclut la plupart des politiques actuelles. Y compris l’extension d’un aéroport.”

Une combinaison parfaite

La fin du monde approche et les jeunes nous rappellent que nous devons agir. C’est la combinaison parfaite pour l’activisme : comme vous n’êtes pas soumis aux normes politiques des adultes, vous avez une sympathie instantanée, et le facteur médiatique est énorme.

Tout le monde peut se sentir vertueux en applaudissant la foule de jeunes marcheurs pour le climat… jusqu’à découvrir ce que cela signifie dans la pratique.

Le nombre de pays participant aux manifestations “Fridays For Future/vendredis pour l’avenir” n’est pas négligeable, mais ce sont des militants allemands qui ont été parmi les premiers à publier une liste complète de revendications qui fait écho aux sentiments des gens de la rue.

Le document exige le respect des objectifs de l’Accord de Paris sur le climat de 2015 pour ne pas dépasser la barre des 1,5°C d’augmentation de la température.

Pour ce faire, l’Allemagne (un pays qui dépend fortement de la production industrielle et du commerce international) devrait atteindre l’objectif de zéro émissions nettes d’ici 2035, d’une élimination complète de l’énergie au charbon d’ici 2030 et d’une utilisation totale des sources d’énergie renouvelables d’ici 2035.

Rappelons que l’Allemagne a commencé à éliminer progressivement l’énergie nucléaire après l’incident de Fukushima, au Japon, en 2011, et s’appuie davantage sur le charbon et le gaz pour maintenir la stabilité énergétique. Cette Energiewende (transition énergétique) a entraîné une augmentation des prix de l’électricité.

Le retour de la taxe carbone

Au-delà d’un simple changement dans la politique énergétique du pays, les marcheurs réclament une taxe carbone lourde, qu’ils fixent à 180€ par tonne de CO2. Même l’économiste Joseph Stiglitz, qu’on peut difficilement qualifier de défenseur de l’économie de marché, estime que ce montant ne sera que de 40$ à 80$ l’année prochaine et ne représentera que la moitié de cette estimation en 2030.

Le magazine allemand Der Spiegel a calculé ce qu’un prix de 180€ par tonne de CO2 signifierait en pratique pour les consommateurs. En voici quelques exemples :

1 litre d’essence : émissions de CO2 de 2,37 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 0,43 €

1 litre de diesel : émissions de CO2 de 2,65 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 0,47 €

1 an d’électricité, ménage moyen de trois personnes dans une maison individuelle sans production d’eau chaude sanitaire, mix électrique 2017 : émissions de CO2 de 1 760 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 317 €

1 kilogramme de bœuf (aliments congelés) : émissions de CO2 de 14,34 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 2,58 €

1 litre de lait : émissions de CO2 de 0,92 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 0,17 €

iPhone X (2017) : émissions de CO2 de 79 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 14,20 €

Vol direct Düsseldorf-New York et retour, classe économique : émissions de CO2 de 3,65 tonnes. Frais supplémentaires : 657 €

Vol Francfort-Auckland via Dubaï, aller-retour, classe économique : émissions de CO2 de 11,71 tonnes. Frais supplémentaires : 2 107 €

L’augmentation du prix du carburant devrait particulièrement attirer l’attention. Y a-t-il eu pareille tentative de taxe de la part des politiciens récemment ? Oui… et même eux n’ont pas tenté une politique fiscale aussi radicale.

Bref.

L’estimation la plus élevée possible des coûts potentiels d’une tonne de CO2, l’explosion des prix à la consommation qui en résulte, montrent le véritable visage de l’écologie : des personnes sans connaissances financières qui ne cherchent pas à trouver des solutions innovantes, mais plutôt à réduire la consommation tout court.

Si vous êtes de la classe moyenne supérieure, 17 centimes de plus par litre de lait ne sera pas la fin du monde. Mais comme ces coûts s’additionnent, les ménages à faible revenu ne pourront bientôt plus se permettre certains produits.

C’est là le véritable objectif final : surtaxer les pauvres pour qu’ils arrêtent de consommer. Que cela vienne d’une génération de nantis qui résident en Allemagne et dans de nombreux pays scandinaves est d’autant plus stupéfiant.

L’avion consomme de moins en moins de carburant et les gens sont de plus en plus conscients que polluer est un problème à la fois esthétique et environnemental. Il n’est pas possible de s’attendre à des changements considérables immédiatement suite à l’indignation des jeunes et, surtout, cela nuira aux ménages à faible revenu qui ont déjà du mal à joindre les deux bouts.

Le jour où ils auront réalisé ce qu’impliquent leurs prescriptions politiques, ces marcheurs du climat mettront leur gilet jaune.

Read more here

It’s time to let Europe go supersonic

When France built its high-speed rail network, it revolutionised the way we looked at train traevl. What takes 4-5 hours by long-distance bus from Brussels to Paris can now be completed in just over an hour with a Thalys train. Dumping slow regional trains for fast and futuristic new models has brought more comfort and time-efficiency to consumers.

In aviation however, the opposite is the case. Since the 1960s, air travel hasn’t gotten any faster. According to Kate Repantis from MIT cruising speeds for commercial airliners today range between about 480 and 510 knots, compared to 525 knots for the Boeing 707, a mainstay of 1960s jet travel.

The reason for that is fuel-efficiency, which translates into cost-efficiency. While pilots have attempted to find the most efficient flight routes, it is slowing flights down which has effectively reduced fuel consumption. According to a story from NBC News in 2008, JetBlue saved about $13.6 million a year in jet fuel by adding just under two minutes to its flights.

But slowing things down doesn’t need to be the only alternative, and it will certainly shock passengers to learn that flight times are actually longer than 60 years ago. We can look at it this way: old regional trains are less electricity-consuming than current high-speed trains going at over 300 km/h, but there is precious little demand to bring travel times between Paris and London back to seven hours. In fact, as we use high-speed rail continuously, the technology improves and energy consumption is reduced. The same dynamic ought to work in aviation.

Supersonic planes have been out of the discussion in Europe for a while, but new innovations should make us reconsider our approach to this technology.

For long-distance intercontinental flights, supersonic planes cut flight time by more than half.  For instance, London-New York would go down from 7 hours to just 3 hours and 15 minutes.

Granted, the fuel-efficiency of current supersonic models isn’t yet ideal, but for a (re)emerging industry the only way from here is up. When considering the evolution of regular planes, which have become 80 per cent more efficient than the first airliners, there are good grounds for optimism about supersonic planes. What’s more, producers of supersonic planes are also supportive of alternative fuel use, a key part of the UN’s 2020 plan for carbon-neutral growth.

Faster flight times for consumers who like innovative solutions to environmental problems. What’s not to like?

The biggest catch is noise levels. As someone who grew up in a town neighbouring an airport, and having lived there almost 20 years, I know the differing views on airport noises. Many in my home village would defend the airport for economic reasons, while others would rally in associations of concerned citizens, fighting the airport one plane at a time. Over the years, their demands have found less support, because as planes became more efficient, they also made less noise.

Here is where supersonic planes aren’t starting from scratch either. While these aircrafts are louder on landing and take-off, new models, like Boom’s futuristic looking Overture,  are 100 times less noisy than the Concorde was. Furthermore, it would be important to compare those things that are comparable, in the same way that wouldn’t equate a regional jet with a large A380 with over 800 passengers. So yes, supersonic planes would be, at least for now, noisier. At the same time, the trade-off would entail faster travel times and the promise of lower emissions down the line.

The least we can do to increase consumer choice in this area is give supersonic a chance. Current regulations are not supportive of the fact that supersonic planes are fundamentally different than regular, subsonic, aircraft. There is a balance that both consumers and concerned citizens can strike, which looks at the questions of A) what we can realistically achieve in terms of reducing noise, and B) the advantageous trade-offs we’d get as a return of allowing Europe to go supersonic.

Les jeunes manifestants pour le climat seront les gilets jaunes de demain

Depuis des mois, les jeunes marcheurs pour le climat s’emparent de l’Europe. Leurs récentes déclarations nous montrent ce qu’ils veulent vraiment – et c’est exactement ce qu’on pensait.

Ces derniers temps, difficile d’ignorer dans la presse les nombreuses images de grandes manifestations en faveur de “l’action pour le climat”. On y trouve notamment les signes les plus drôles que tiennent de jeunes lycéens, incitant les politiciens à adopter des actions inspirantes.

Jusqu’à présent, ce que les marcheurs du climat espéraient réellement réaliser n’était pas tout à fait clair.

Pour la plupart, les activistes déplorent simplement que les politiciens et les riches restent les bras croisés alors que la planète tend vers son inévitable effondrement, prévu pour dans 12 ans.

Leur symbole : Greta Thunberg, élève de secondaire de 16 ans, qui a initié le mouvement avec sa “grève scolaire” pour le climat.

Mais à l’approche de ses 18 ans, âge officiellement requis pour se présenter aux élections législatives en Suède, son pays d’origine, il lui est désormais crucial d’avoir un programme politique clair. La question est : que faire exactement contre la catastrophe climatique ?

Ces jeunes gens voudront commencer “doucement”, en exigeant simplement que toutes les émissions de carbone cessent immédiatement. Un exemple ? Annuler l’expansion vitale de l’aéroport de Copenhague, dont la jeune fille suédoise parle dans un tweet.

tweet de Greta Thunberg

“L’erreur la plus dangereuse que l’on puisse faire quant à la crise climatique est peut-être de penser que nous devons ‘réduire’ nos émissions. Parce que c’est loin de suffire. Nos émissions doivent cesser si nous voulons rester sous les 1,5/2° de réchauffement. Cela exclut la plupart des politiques actuelles. Y compris l’extension d’un aéroport.”

Une combinaison parfaite

La fin du monde approche et les jeunes nous rappellent que nous devons agir. C’est la combinaison parfaite pour l’activisme : comme vous n’êtes pas soumis aux normes politiques des adultes, vous avez une sympathie instantanée, et le facteur médiatique est énorme.

Tout le monde peut se sentir vertueux en applaudissant la foule de jeunes marcheurs pour le climat… jusqu’à découvrir ce que cela signifie dans la pratique.

Le nombre de pays participant aux manifestations “Fridays For Future/vendredis pour l’avenir” n’est pas négligeable, mais ce sont des militants allemands qui ont été parmi les premiers à publier une liste complète de revendicationsqui fait écho aux sentiments des gens de la rue.

Le document exige le respect des objectifs de l’Accord de Paris sur le climat de 2015 pour ne pas dépasser la barre des 1,5°C d’augmentation de la température.

Pour ce faire, l’Allemagne (un pays qui dépend fortement de la production industrielle et du commerce international) devrait atteindre l’objectif de zéro émissions nettes d’ici 2035, d’une élimination complète de l’énergie au charbon d’ici 2030 et d’une utilisation totale des sources d’énergie renouvelables d’ici 2035.

Rappelons que l’Allemagne a commencé à éliminer progressivement l’énergie nucléaire après l’incident de Fukushima, au Japon, en 2011, et s’appuie davantage sur le charbon et le gaz pour maintenir la stabilité énergétique. Cette Energiewende (transition énergétique) a entraîné une augmentation des prix de l’électricité.

Le retour de la taxe carbone

Au-delà d’un simple changement dans la politique énergétique du pays, les marcheurs réclament une taxe carbone lourde, qu’ils fixent à 180€ par tonne de CO2. Même l’économiste Joseph Stiglitz, qu’on peut difficilement qualifier de défenseur de l’économie de marché, estime que ce montant ne sera que de 40$ à 80$ l’année prochaine et ne représentera que la moitié de cette estimation en 2030.

Le magazine allemand Der Spiegel a calculé ce qu’un prix de 180€ par tonne de CO2 signifierait en pratique pour les consommateurs. En voici quelques exemples :

  • 1 litre d’essence : émissions de CO2 de 2,37 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 0,43 €
  • 1 litre de diesel : émissions de CO2 de 2,65 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 0,47 €
  • 1 an d’électricité, ménage moyen de trois personnes dans une maison individuelle sans production d’eau chaude sanitaire, mix électrique 2017 : émissions de CO2 de 1 760 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 317 €
  • 1 kilogramme de bœuf (aliments congelés) : émissions de CO2 de 14,34 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 2,58 €
  • 1 litre de lait : émissions de CO2 de 0,92 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 0,17 €
  • iPhone X (2017) : émissions de CO2 de 79 kg. Frais supplémentaires : 14,20 €
  • Vol direct Düsseldorf-New York et retour, classe économique : émissions de CO2 de 3,65 tonnes. Frais supplémentaires : 657 €
  • Vol Francfort-Auckland via Dubaï, aller-retour, classe économique : émissions de CO2 de 11,71 tonnes. Frais supplémentaires : 2 107 €

L’augmentation du prix du carburant devrait particulièrement attirer l’attention. Y a-t-il eu pareille tentative de taxe de la part des politiciens récemment ? Oui… et même eux n’ont pas tenté une politique fiscale aussi radicale.

Bref.

L’estimation la plus élevée possible des coûts potentiels d’une tonne de CO2, l’explosion des prix à la consommation qui en résulte, montrent le véritable visage de l’écologie : des personnes sans connaissances financières qui ne cherchent pas à trouver des solutions innovantes, mais plutôt à réduire la consommation tout court.

Si vous êtes de la classe moyenne supérieure, 17 centimes de plus par litre de lait ne sera pas la fin du monde. Mais comme ces coûts s’additionnent, les ménages à faible revenu ne pourront bientôt plus se permettre certains produits.

C’est là le véritable objectif final : surtaxer les pauvres pour qu’ils arrêtent de consommer. Que cela vienne d’une génération de nantis qui résident en Allemagne et dans de nombreux pays scandinaves est d’autant plus stupéfiant.

L’avion consomme de moins en moins de carburant et les gens sont de plus en plus conscients que polluer est un problème à la fois esthétique et environnemental. Il n’est pas possible de s’attendre à des changements considérables immédiatement suite à l’indignation des jeunes et, surtout, cela nuira aux ménages à faible revenu qui ont déjà du mal à joindre les deux bouts.

Le jour où ils auront réalisé ce qu’impliquent leurs prescriptions politiques, ces marcheurs du climat mettront leur gilet jaune.

Read more here

Maine first state to ban single-use foam

It has been stated that polystyrene is non-recyclable, but Jeff Stier of the Consumer Choice Center says these foam products can indeed be recycled.

OneNewsNow interviewed Stier, a New York resident, after The Big Apple announced a ban on foam cups and containers.

Read more here

Scroll to top