German FM in Washington to Promote ‘German American Friendship’ Amid Polls Pointing to Troubled Ties

CNS NEWS: “Both sides benefit from free trade,” said Bill Wirtz, a policy analyst for Consumer Choice Center, an international nonprofit that monitors regulatory trends. “President Trump has said previously that he advocates for no tariff and non-tariff barriers. After all, tariffs hurt consumers on both ends.

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About Bill Wirtz

Bill Wirtz is policy analyst for the Consumer Choice Center, based in Brussels, Belgium. Originally from Luxembourg, his articles have appeared across the world in English, French, German, and Luxembourgish. He is Editor-in-Chief of Speak Freely, the blog of European Students for Liberty, a contributing editor for the Freedom Today Network and a regular contributor for the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). He blogs regularly on his website in four languages.

Scrap the Diesel car ban

Bill Wirtz says that rather than tightening restrictions on Diesel cars we should be relaxing them.  

A court in Wiesbaden ruled last week that local authorities in Frankfurt must ban older diesel cars as part of efforts to clean up air quality. Much like earlier bans in cities like Stuttgart, the ban is taking place under questionable lobbying circumstances and denies consumer choice.

Diesel engines have come under fire in recent months for their pretended effect on public health. Environmental activists had been working for years on outright bans for circulating diesel cars, pointing to its health effects in comparison to other combustion engines. The science on that is questionable.

Former President of the German Pneumology Society, Doctor Dieter Köhler, contradicts these activists and sees only a minor health-endangering role in particulate matter and nitrogen oxides. Many studies would be misinterpreted findings, and the costs of outlawing diesel vehicles would stand in no proportionate relationship to health hazards.

The Canadian government also agrees with this assessment. It writes: “Today’s diesel vehicles are cleaner, quieter and perform on par or better than their gasoline counterparts. The improvements result from the availability of cleaner fuels and the use of advanced technologies, including electronic controls, common rail fuel injection, turbocharging, sound dampening and exhaust emission reduction components.”

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), which represents motor-vehicle manufacturers (and other on that particular supply chain, independently of their productions), writes this: “Diesel is critical to reducing CO2emissions, which in turn is tackling climate change – diesel cars emit, on average, 20% lower CO2 than petrol equivalents. In fact, since 2002, diesel cars have saved 3.5 million tonnes of CO2 from going into the atmosphere.”

A noticeably stark contrast with the claims of Deutsche Umwelthilfe, which does accept that so far, only Volkswagen has been forced to admit to cheating on its emissions testing, however, “almost all other important manufacturers have been able to prove that their own measurements have in part shown massive exceedances of limit values. The results: 33 out of 36 diesel vehicles measured exceed the nitrogen oxide limits on the road, sometimes many times over.”

You won’t find Toyota amongst those named by Deutsche Umwelthilfe, because the group cashed in €80,000 from the Japanese manufacturer over the years. The fact that Toyota produces mainly petrol and hybrid cars and is likely to benefit from bans on diesel cars, particularly if they come in quickly, must of course be completely unrelated. In the meantime, their mentions of Ford should also make their fundraising department nervous, as it receives grants from the American ClimateWorks Foundation, which is mainly sponsored by the Henry Ford Foundation.

In July last year, the French government decided to ban all cars that run on petrol by 2040. Given that only 1.2 per cent of French cars are electric, only a harsh restriction of consumer choices and stringent sanctions can make that possible in the next 20 years.

In 2040, if we are still in need of cars running on fossil fuels, the ban would be disastrous and is unlikely to be implemented, and if we don’t need them anymore by that time the legislation would be obsolete. The pretense, however, that it is the role of government to choose winners and losers in the innovation of a free market, is ridiculous. Consumers can decide for themselves whether they want to get a diesel car or not, and it definitely shouldn’t be the role of environmentalist organisations to advance an anti-science narrative, only to satisfy their donors or an ideological base which is hungry for yet another ban on people’s lifestyles.

What is needed are legislative changes than loosen the current strict rules on diesel cars, which would prevent courts from outlawing them all together. If not the consequences for consumer choice, industry and jobs related to both manufacturing and tourism could be disastrous.

Originally published at http://commentcentral.co.uk/scrap-the-diesel-car-ban/

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About Bill Wirtz

Bill Wirtz is policy analyst for the Consumer Choice Center, based in Brussels, Belgium. Originally from Luxembourg, his articles have appeared across the world in English, French, German, and Luxembourgish. He is Editor-in-Chief of Speak Freely, the blog of European Students for Liberty, a contributing editor for the Freedom Today Network and a regular contributor for the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). He blogs regularly on his website in four languages.

Eltern nicht bevormunden

DIE WELT: Die Gesundheitsminister der Europäischen Union haben Vorschläge für die Regulierung der Vermarktung von sogenanntem Junkfood vorgelegt, in denen Beschränkungen von Werbung solcher Produkte gefordert werden.

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About Bill Wirtz

Bill Wirtz is policy analyst for the Consumer Choice Center, based in Brussels, Belgium. Originally from Luxembourg, his articles have appeared across the world in English, French, German, and Luxembourgish. He is Editor-in-Chief of Speak Freely, the blog of European Students for Liberty, a contributing editor for the Freedom Today Network and a regular contributor for the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). He blogs regularly on his website in four languages.

Zeichentrickfiguren auf Frühstücksflocken sollen weg

THE EUROPEAN: “Befürworter der öffentlichen Gesundheit” wollen gegen eine massive Gefahr vorgehen: Zeichentrickfiguren auf Packungen von Getreideflocken, wie zum Beispiel die der Marke Kellogg’s. Angeblich haben es Tony der Tiger, Sonny der Kuckuck Vogel, Cap’n Crunch oder Graf Chocula alle auf unsere Kinder abgesehen.

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About Bill Wirtz

Bill Wirtz is policy analyst for the Consumer Choice Center, based in Brussels, Belgium. Originally from Luxembourg, his articles have appeared across the world in English, French, German, and Luxembourgish. He is Editor-in-Chief of Speak Freely, the blog of European Students for Liberty, a contributing editor for the Freedom Today Network and a regular contributor for the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). He blogs regularly on his website in four languages.

Germany should allow donating organs to strangers

HANDELSBLATT GLOBAL: Some people die in Germany because it prohibits organ donations to strangers. Berlin should emulate other nations and change the law to save lives.

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About Fred Roeder

Fred Roder has been working in the field of grassroots activism for over eight years. He is a Health Economist from Germany and has worked in healthcare reform and market access in North America, Europe, and several former Soviet Republics. One of his passions is to analyze how disruptive industries and technologies allow consumers more choice at a lower cost. Fred is very interested in consumer choice and regulatory trends in the following industries: FMCG, Sharing Economy, Airlines. In 2014 he organized a protest in Berlin advocating for competition in the Taxi market. Fred has traveled to 100 countries and is looking forward to visiting the other half of the world’s countries. Among many op-eds and media appearances, he has been published in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Wirtschaftswoche, Die Welt, the BBC, SunTV, ABC Portland News, Montreal Gazette, Handelsblatt, Huffington Post Germany, CityAM. L’Agefi, and The Guardian. Since 2012 he serves as an Associated Researcher at the Montreal Economic Institute.

Hamburg bekommt aus USA Auszeichnung für Fahrverbote

PAGEN STECHER: Hamburg erfährt mit seinen beiden Mini-Fahrverboten nicht nur bundesweite Aufmerksamkeit. Auch in den USA stoßen die Maßnahmen auf ein Echo. Das Consumer Choice Center (CCC) hat heute der Hansestadt den BAN-Award verliehen.

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About Fred Roeder

Fred Roder has been working in the field of grassroots activism for over eight years. He is a Health Economist from Germany and has worked in healthcare reform and market access in North America, Europe, and several former Soviet Republics. One of his passions is to analyze how disruptive industries and technologies allow consumers more choice at a lower cost. Fred is very interested in consumer choice and regulatory trends in the following industries: FMCG, Sharing Economy, Airlines. In 2014 he organized a protest in Berlin advocating for competition in the Taxi market. Fred has traveled to 100 countries and is looking forward to visiting the other half of the world’s countries. Among many op-eds and media appearances, he has been published in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Wirtschaftswoche, Die Welt, the BBC, SunTV, ABC Portland News, Montreal Gazette, Handelsblatt, Huffington Post Germany, CityAM. L’Agefi, and The Guardian. Since 2012 he serves as an Associated Researcher at the Montreal Economic Institute.

How Europe’s Pharmacy Lobby wants us to keep paying too much for Aspirin

VOCAL EUROPE: The European Union has been successful in opening and liberalizing many industries in the past decades. Among them telecommunication, airlines, and banking. All these liberalization efforts lead to lower prices and more choice for European consumers.

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About Fred Roeder

Fred Roder has been working in the field of grassroots activism for over eight years. He is a Health Economist from Germany and has worked in healthcare reform and market access in North America, Europe, and several former Soviet Republics. One of his passions is to analyze how disruptive industries and technologies allow consumers more choice at a lower cost. Fred is very interested in consumer choice and regulatory trends in the following industries: FMCG, Sharing Economy, Airlines. In 2014 he organized a protest in Berlin advocating for competition in the Taxi market. Fred has traveled to 100 countries and is looking forward to visiting the other half of the world’s countries. Among many op-eds and media appearances, he has been published in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Wirtschaftswoche, Die Welt, the BBC, SunTV, ABC Portland News, Montreal Gazette, Handelsblatt, Huffington Post Germany, CityAM. L’Agefi, and The Guardian. Since 2012 he serves as an Associated Researcher at the Montreal Economic Institute.

Freie Fahrt für Busse in Europa: die EU-Kommission glaubt an das deutsche Modell

PLL: Die Europäische Kommission hat einen Vorschlag zur Liberalisierung des europäischen Intercity-Busmarktes vorgelegt. Im Mobilitätspaket der Kommission wird den Busunternehmen die Möglichkeit gegeben, zwischen den Städten Fahrten über 100 Kilometer zu organisieren. Dieser Schritt folgt einem Beschluss des Verkehrsrates vom Februar letzten Jahres und einem noch früheren Vorstoß der Kommission für die Liberalisierung vor vier Jahren.

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About Bill Wirtz

Bill Wirtz is policy analyst for the Consumer Choice Center, based in Brussels, Belgium. Originally from Luxembourg, his articles have appeared across the world in English, French, German, and Luxembourgish. He is Editor-in-Chief of Speak Freely, the blog of European Students for Liberty, a contributing editor for the Freedom Today Network and a regular contributor for the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). He blogs regularly on his website in four languages.

Wo bleibt die Wahlfreiheit der Verbraucher?

THE EUROPEAN: In einem wegweisenden Urteil hat das Bundesverwaltungsgericht diese Woche entschieden, dass Städte das Recht haben, Dieselfahrzeuge zu verbieten.

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About Bill Wirtz

Bill Wirtz is policy analyst for the Consumer Choice Center, based in Brussels, Belgium. Originally from Luxembourg, his articles have appeared across the world in English, French, German, and Luxembourgish. He is Editor-in-Chief of Speak Freely, the blog of European Students for Liberty, a contributing editor for the Freedom Today Network and a regular contributor for the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). He blogs regularly on his website in four languages.

Macht Facebook süchtig wie Alkohol oder Tabak?

DIE WELT: Eine Regulierung der Social-Media-Aktivitäten meint es vielleicht gut. Doch frühere Erfahrungen mit der Prohibition zeigen die Gefahr dann entstehender Grauzonen auf. Es gibt nur einen richtigen Weg. Bill Wirtz von Consumer Choice Center.

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About Bill Wirtz

Bill Wirtz is policy analyst for the Consumer Choice Center, based in Brussels, Belgium. Originally from Luxembourg, his articles have appeared across the world in English, French, German, and Luxembourgish. He is Editor-in-Chief of Speak Freely, the blog of European Students for Liberty, a contributing editor for the Freedom Today Network and a regular contributor for the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). He blogs regularly on his website in four languages.