Railway Stations Index

Das sind die besten Bahnhöfe Europas

Eine Verbraucherschutz-Organisation hat die 50 größten Bahnhöfe in Europa untersucht: Wo lässt es sich gut warten, stimmt die Infrastruktur und wie oft wird gestreikt? Gleich fünf deutsche Städte schaffen es unter die ersten zehn Plätze.

Bahnhöfe sind Durchgangsstationen, an denen man nie lange bleiben möchte. Doch oft zwingen Verspätungen oder Zugausfälle zu langen Wartezeiten. Dann zeigt sich, wie gut das Umfeld wirklich ist: Gibt es genügend Restaurants, Läden und Lounges?

Die Verbraucherschutz-Organisation Consumer Choice Center hat jetzt ihren jährlichen European Railway Station Index für 2020 vorgelegt. Darin werden die 50 großen Bahnhöfe Europas mit deren Infrastruktur genauer untersucht.

Für die Bewertung spielen Kriterien wie deren Fahrgastzahlen, die Zahl der nationalen und internationalen Verbindungen, die Sauberkeit, Ausschilderung und die Anzahl der Fahrstühle eine Rolle. Aber auch der barrierefreie Zugang für Rollstuhlfahrer, die Anbindung an den öffentlichen Personennahverkehr, die Zahl der Restaurationsbetriebe und Läden für die Versorgung werden berücksichtigt und fließen in den Index ein.

Streiktage sorgen für Abwertung

Interessant ist auch die Angabe von Streiktragen, unter denen die Passagiere gelitten haben: Mit einem Spitzenwert von 118 Tagen in Frankreich schaffte es kein französischer Bahnhof in das Ranking der Top Ten.

In der Gesamtauswertung landeten fünf Bahnhöfe in Deutschland unter den ersten zehn. Allerdings erreichte die höchste Punktzahl ein Bahnhof in London: St. Pancras International erhielt ein Score von 116 – von 139 möglichen Punkten.

Aufschlussreich sind auch die Schlusslichter, zu denen neben Porta Nuova in Turin, Oslos Hauptbahnhof, der Bahnhof Friedrichstraße in Berlin und der Hauptbahnhof Dortmund gehören. Letzterer hat in Punkto Sauberkeit mit nur 40 Prozent besonders schlecht abgeschnitten.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

Europe’s best and worst railways revealed for train travel

Tourists are returning to the rails in ever greater numbers.

Particularly in Europe, the romance, sustainable credentials and economy of train travel has seen consecutive growth in passenger numbers for the past seven years.

And of course, every great journey must have a suitably grand start.

Like cathedrals of public transport, the giant railway stations of France, Germany and beyond are central to the experience. However, not all railway stations were created equal: for every Grand Stazione Milano Centrale there is a soulless terminus like Berlin’s Friedrichstrasse that can put a dampener on your trip.

To help travellers arrive on time and inspired, the European Railway Station Index has been compiled to rank the continent’s 50 largest stations, from best to worst.

Embarked upon by the Consumer Choice Centre, its railway inspectors have marked the public travel hubs on criteria including accessibility, cleanliness, signage and the connections available.

The number of days affected by strikes is another important consideration for European rail stations.

Leading the carriage with a score of 116 out of a possible 139, was London’s St Pancras.

Marked as the “best railways station in Europe” the UK’s international rail terminal scored highly for fast Eurostar connections to France, Belgium and now the Netherlands. Although it scored highly for amenities – the station’s famous champagne bar “did not influence this ranking,” insisted the CCC.

Germany dominated the list. While none of its stations took the top spot the consistency of the Bahnhofs saw the centres of Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg and Munich all feature in the top 10 list.

More surprisingly, the best railway in Germany according to the CCC is in the eastern city of Leipzig which came in at number 3. The grand East German “hof” is huge and offers a great number of international connections as a starting point for a European sojourn by rail.

While the list exposed some great inspiration future European rail itineraries, the other end of the table featured some shockers. Paris’ Magenta station scored only 41 out of 139 points for dismal performance for trains’ on time record and a general ambiance which is more dismal still. According to the CCC index rankings it has hit the buffers as Europe’s worst major train station.

The Index was also keen to point out that bigger did not always mean better. “The size of a railway station does not necessarily mean more convenience or better infrastructure,” they said pointing out that some of Europe’s largest stations such as Paris Gare du Nord and Madrid Atocha didn’t even feature in the top 10.

French stations overall performed poorly due to regular industrial action and almost annual summer strikes aimed at disrupting travel.

Helsinki’s beautiful central station “Päärautatieasema” also fell far down the rankings.

As far as we are aware, Helsinki’s station wasn’t penalised for too many consecutive vowels but it would appear it scored 0 for cleanliness, amenities and its lack of “first class lounge option.”

“Train travel has received a more important role in Europe in recent years,” said the CCC.

While the centre also runs a sister index for European Airports, the CCC was aware that rail travel was growing amongst environmentally conscious travellers. Although they insisted this index was an opportunity to showcase the efficiency and convenience of rail versus flight.

“Policy makers and consumers have oriented toward train travel as a means of reducing carbon emissions.

“While we at the Consumer Choice Center stand for choice and technology neutrality, we want to use the rise of interest in long distance train travel as an opportunity to show which railway stations in Europe are the most convenient for travellers,” they said.

Europe’s 10 best train stations

1.St Pancras, London, UK
2.Zürich Central Station, Zurich, Switzerland
3.Leipzig Central Station, Leipzig, Germany
4.Roma Termini, Rome, Italy
5.München Central Station, Munich, Germany
6.Hamburg Central Station, Hamburg, Germany
7.Berlin Central Station, Berlin, Germany
8.Milan Central Station, Milan, Italy
9.Moscow Kazansky, Moscow, Russia
10.Frankfurt Central Station, Frankfurt, Germany

Europe’s 10 worst train stations

1.Magenta, Paris, France
2.Nørreport, Copenhagen, Denmark
3.Haussmann-Saint-Lazare, Paris, France
4.Châtelet–Les Halles, Paris, France
5.Torino Porta Nuova, Turin, Italy
6.Oslo Central Station, Oslo, Norway
7.Dortmund Central Station, Dortmund, Germany
8.Berlin Friedrichstrasse, Berlin, Germany
9.Wien Mitte, Vienna, Austria
10.Helsinki Central Station, Helsinki, Finland

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

St. Pancras International désignée meilleure gare d’Europe

Quelle gare offre le voyage le plus agréable en Europe? Le collectif indépendant de défense des consommateurs qui agit à l’échelle du vieux continent (Consumer Choice Center) vient de titrer Londres St. Pancras International dans un classement qui prend en compte la fréquentation, le nombre de jours de grève, les services aux voyageurs…

Londres et l’Allemagne

Si Londres obtient la médaille d’or, l’Allemagne se détache largement comme le pays où le voyage en train est le plus pratique et le plus confortable. Successivement, Leipzig, Munich, Hambourg, Berlin, Francfort et Hanovre s’illustrent dans le haut du tableau. 

Ce classement prend en compte un grand nombre de critères. La propreté des gares mais aussi la clarté des affichages, le nombre de jours de grève, la proportion d’entreprises ferroviaires se partageant les rails, la diversification des boutiques et des restaurants, la présence d’ascenseurs ou encore la desserte de destinations internationales ont été identifiés pour proposer le classement le plus clair. 

Pays du train par excellence, la Suisse s’impose comme la deuxième destination où il est le plus aisé de monter à bord: Zurich est deuxième et Berne dixième. L’Italie ferme la marche des pays les mieux représentés grâce à Rome (4e) et Milan (8e).

Top 10 des meilleures gares ferroviaires d’Europe:

1. London St Pancras International (Royaume-Uni)

2. Zurich Central Station (Suisse)

3. Leipzig Central Station (Allemagne)

4. Roma Termini (Italie)

5. München Central Station (Allemagne)

6. Hamburg Central Station (Allemagne) – ex-aequo avec Berlin Central Station (Allemagne

8. Milano Centrale (Italie)

9. Moscow Kazansky (Russie) – ex-aequo avec Frankfurt Central Station (Allemagne)

10. Bern Railway Station (Suisse)

Consulter le classementhttps://consumerchoicecenter.org

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

Estas son las mejores estaciones de tren de Europa

Tanto los responsables políticos como los ciudadanos se han ido concienciando en los últimos años del riesgo para el medio ambiente que suponen los viajes en avión. De ahí que muchos turistas, siempre que sea posible, estén optando por desplazarse en tren, incluso en trayectos de larga distancia.

A raíz del crecimiento de los viajes en tren, el Consumer Choice Center ha elaborado un informe llamado European Railway Index (Índice Ferroviario Europeo), que clasifica a las mejores estaciones del Viejo Continente basándose en distintos factores como número de pasajeros y plataformas, cantidad de destinos naciones e internacionales, limpieza o accesibilidad. El estudio da una puntuación por cada dato analizado siendo de 139 la máxima posible.

El informe analiza un total de 50 grandes estaciones de Europa y llama la atención que entre los 10 primeros puestos de la lista hay cinco de Alemania.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

Ferrovie, due stazioni italiane tra le prime dieci in Europa

Il Consumer Choice Center (CCC) ha esaminato le 51 maggiori stazioni ferroviarie d’Europa e le ha classificate in base all’esperienza dei passeggeri, analizzando una combinazione di fattori che vanno da come sono affollate le piattaforme all’accessibilità, dal numero di destinazioni nazionali e internazionali alla pulizia. Tutto sommato, per l’Italia, i risultati sono lusingheri.

La top ten

I giudici hanno incoronato St. Pancras International di Londra come la migliore stazione ferroviaria d’Europa. Zurigo si è collocata al secondo posto mentre la stazione centrale di Lipsia ha conquistato il gradino più basso del podio ponendosi come la migliore in Germania.

Subito sotto (quarto posto) c’è la prima stazione italiana che è quella di Roma Termini seguita da Monaco di Baviera. La Germania fa tripletta con Amburgo e Berlino pari merito al sesto posto (si parla sempre di stazioni centrali) mentre ottava è la seconda stazione italiana, Milano Centrale. Chiudono la classifica della top ten Mosca Kazansky e ancora un impianto tedesco, quello di Francoforte.

A livello di nazioni, dunque, svetta la Germania con cinque stazioni, seguita dall’Italia con due e quindi Gran Bretagna, Svizzera e Russia con una.

Secondo CCC tutte brillano grazie al basso numero di giorni di sciopero, alle diverse destinazioni offerte, all’accessibilità per i passeggeri su sedia a rotelle e alle diverse offerte alimentari e commerciali. In tal senso le stazioni francesi sono state escluse per i troppi giorni di sciopero mentre Roma Termini potrebbe avere una valutazione migliore ma offre solo sei destinazioni internazionali contro, ad esempio, le cinquantuno di Lipsia.
Milano Centrale, per contro, ha un’offerta commerciale meno convincente.

Il resto della classifica

Naturalmente, ci sono altre stazioni italiane che compiono in questa classifica delle prime 51 in Europa: abbiamo Firenze Santa Maria NovellaRoma Tiburtina Bologna Centrale tutte appaiate al 38esimo posto!

Poi troviamo Torino Porta Nuova al 47esmo posto. La maglia nera della classifica (51 posto) va alla stazione di Parigi Magenta.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

London St Pancras is named Europe’s best railway station

From its soaring gothic spires to its vast glazed roof to its croissant-packed concourse below, St Pancras station is well loved by Londoners. 

But now its status is official: St Pancras International has been named the best railway station in Europe by the Consumer Choice Centre.

St Pancras, which serves 35.6 million passengers a year, came out top among Europe’s 50 biggest stations for accessibility for wheelchair users, cleanliness and range of destinations served. Wheelchair users have previously praised the station’s step-free access to the Underground and helpful staff.

The European Railway Station Index also noted St Pancras’s excellent range of shops and restaurants (although they gave it minus points for rail strikes – boo!) and scored it a superb 116 points out of 139. 

St Pancras International even beat Zürich Central to the top spot, despite the Swiss station’s 100 percent score for cleanliness. There is NO DIRT on Zürich station.

Other London stations have done us proud too. The newly-refurbed London Bridge made it into fifteenth place and London Victoria got the twentieth spot.

Feeling inspired? Eurostar’s just opened a direct train from St Pancras International to Amsterdam from April, from just £35 each way. A direct service to Rotterdam opens in May.  

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

London St Pancras tops list of Europe’s best train stations

Europe’s best train station for passengers has been revealed, with London St Pancras taking the top spot.

A new survey from the Consumer Choice Centre has ranked Europe’s fifty largest train stations by a series of metrics including accessibility, cleanliness, number of platforms, hospitality and number of strike days, to give a composite score out of 139.

St Pancras topped the list with a score of 116, thanks to its low number of strike days, international connectivity, and convenience for passengers.

No other UK station made the top 10, with Birmingham New Street coming in 12th with a score of 93. London Bridge came 15th, London Victoria 20th, and London Liverpool Street 22nd.

The rest of the top ten was dominated by German stations, with Leipzig, Munich, Hamburg, Berlin and Frankfurt all making the list.

Europe’s top 10 stations for passengers

StationScorePassenger volume (per year)
St Pancras International11635.6m
Zurich Central Station111154.6m
Leipzig Central Station11043.8m
Roma Termini108150m
Munich Central Station103127.8m
Hamburg Central Station99200.7m
Berlin Central Station99110m
Milan Central Station96120m
Moscow Kazansky9450.1m
Frankfurt Central Station94164.3m

Fred Roeder, managing director of the Consumer Choice Center, said the ranking demonstrates the power of offering both practicality and comfort at major railway stations.

“As any traveler knows during peak times, many railway stations struggle with passenger peaks, and that experience trickles down to everyone who takes a train.

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“High points were awarded to the stations that offered great destinations around the continent, but also a healthy mix of shops, restaurants, and conveniences found at the station.

“We also awarded stations that experience the lowest number of strike days, something passengers in many countries could only wish for”.

Europe’s worst 10 stations for passengers

StationScorePassenger volume (per year)
Paris Magenta4141.3m
Copenhagen Norreport4353.7m
Paris Haussmann-Saint-Lazare4444.6m
Paris Chatelet-les-Halles58179.9m
Torino Porta Nuova6070m
Oslo Central Station6154.8m
Dortmund Central Station6347.4m
Berlin Friedrichstrasse6376.7m
Vienna Wien Mitte6397.8m
Helsinki Central Station6473.2m

The bottom of the list was dominated by French stations, with three of the bottom four all located in Paris.

Paris Magenta came last with a score of 43, suffering especially from the number of strikes days that it has been struck by, followed by Denmark’s Copenhagen station, and Haussmann-Saint-Lazare and Chatelet-Les-Halles in Paris.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

The best railway stations in Europe named – and it’s London’s St Pancras International that is No1 (with not a single French station in the top 10)

London‘s St Pancras International has been named as the best railway station in Europe in a new ranking.

Researchers looked at 51 of the biggest stations across Europe and scored them on factors including the quality of signage, the convenience of accessing platforms and the number of shops and restaurants.

Zurich Central Station in Switzerland is second in the ranking while Germany‘s Leipzig Central Station is third.

The ranking, called the European Railway Station Index, has been compiled by the Consumer Choice Center (CCC).

Other factors that were taken into consideration when creating the ranking were the availability of ride-hailing services, the number of international destinations served, the average number of strike days and the existence of first-class lounges.

Topped-ranked St Pancras claims the number one spot because researchers say it has a ‘low number of strike days, high passenger convenience and international connectivity’.

Second-place Zurich was found to have a high number of shops and restaurants, while Leipzig claims third for serving 51 domestic and six international destinations.

In fourth place is Rome’s Termini station and in fifth spot is Munich Central Station.

Hamburg and Berlin Central Stations are joint sixth, with Milan Centrale Station in eighth.

Moscow Kazansky and Frankfurt Central Station make up the rest of the top 10 in joint ninth place.

Other railway stations in the UK in the ranking are Birmingham New Street (joint 11th), London Bridge (joint 14th), London Victoria (joint 20th), London Liverpool Street (joint 25th) and London Euston (joint 32nd).

The station at the bottom of the ranking is Magenta station in Paris.

Also faring badly are Nørreport Station in Copenhagen (50th), Haussmann-Saint-Lazare (49th) and Châtelet–Les Halles (48th). The latter two are both in Paris.

Fred Roeder, managing director of the Consumer Choice Center, said: ‘As any traveller knows, during peak times, many railway stations struggle with passenger peaks, and that experience trickles down to everyone who takes a train.

‘High points were awarded to the stations that offered great destinations around the continent and also had a healthy mix of shops, restaurants, and conveniences.

‘We also rewarded stations that experience the lowest number of strike days, something passengers in many countries could only wish for.

‘London St Pancras does not just look like a station from another world but also leads this index as Europe’s best railway station. Generally, Germany and Italy lead the way in Europe.

‘Half of the top 10 stations in Europe are in Germany and two are in Italy. Not a single French station made it in the top 10.’

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at consumerchoicecenter.org

London St Pancras named Europe’s best train station

HICL buys HS1 channel tunnel link

The win was accredited to its low number of strike days, high passenger convenience and international connectivity.

London St Pancras has been named the best train station in Europe in a new comprehensive report compiled by the Consumer Choice Centre (CCC).

The European Railway Station Index scored Europe’s 50 largest railway stations out of a possible 139 points across criteria including accessibility for wheelchair users, cleanliness, signage, platforms and range of destinations served.

They were also scored on the choice of restaurants and shops and first-class lounge facilities, plus points were subtracted based on the number of days affected by rail strikes.

German stations

St Pancras placed top with an overall score of 116, with Birmingham New Street (12th), London Bridge (15th) and London Victoria (20th) also making it into the top 20.

German stations ranked the best overall, with five of the top 10 based in Germany: Leipzig, Munich, Hamburg, Berlin and Frankfurt.

Italy also had two entries, with Roma Termini and Milan Central Station ranking fourth and eighth respectively.

At the other end of the spectrum, Magenta station in Paris achieved the lowest score (41), followed by Nørreport station in Copenhagen and Haussmann-Saint-Lazare in Paris.

Strike days, passenger convenience and international connectivity

“Train travel has received a more important role in Europe in recent years,” said the CCC.

“Policy makers and consumers have oriented toward train travel as a means of reducing carbon emissions.

“While we at the Consumer Choice Center stand for choice and technology neutrality, we want to use the rise of interest in long distance train travel as an opportunity to show which railway stations in Europe are the most convenient for travellers.”

The CCC attributed St Pancras’ win to its low number of strike days, high passenger convenience and international connectivity.

“The fact that it also hosts the longest champagne bar in Europe did not influence this ranking,” it added.

Europe’s 10 best train stations

St Pancras, London, UK

Zürich Central Station, Zurich, Switzerland

Leipzig Central Station, Leipzig, Germany

Roma Termini, Rome, Italy

München Central Station, Munich, Germany

Hamburg Central Station, Hamburg, Germany

Berlin Central Station, Berlin, Germany

Milan Central Station, Milan, Italy

Moscow Kazansky, Moscow, Russia

Frankfurt Central Station, Frankfurt, Germany

Europe’s 10 worst train stations

Magenta, Paris, France

Nørreport, Copenhagen, Denmark

Haussmann-Saint-Lazare, Paris, France

Châtelet–Les Halles, Paris, France

Torino Porta Nuova, Turin, Italy

Oslo Central Station, Oslo, Norway

Dortmund Central Station, Dortmund, Germany

Berlin Friedrichstrasse, Berlin, Germany

Wien Mitte, Vienna, Austria

Helsinki Central Station, Helsinki, Finland


Originally published here.

LONDON ST PANCRAS CROWNED BEST TRAIN STATION IN EUROPE

London St Pancras has been named Europe’s best train station in a new ranking.

The European Railway Station Index, compiled by the Consumer Choice Centre (CCC), scored Europe’s 50 largest railway stations out of a possible 139 points, across criteria including accessibility for wheelchair users, cleanliness, signage, platforms and range of destinations served.

They were also scored on the choice of restaurants and shops and first-class lounge facilities, plus points were subtracted based on the number of days affected by rail strikes.

Home to Eurostar services to France, Belgium and the Netherlands, St Pancras placed top with an overall score of 116.

However, it was the only UK station to make the top 10.

German stations were rated the best in general, with five of the top 10 based in Germany: LeipzigMunich, Hamburg, Berlin and Frankfurt.

Italy also had two entries, with Roma Termini and Milan Central Station ranking fourth and eighth respectively.

Several more British stations made it into the top 20: Birmingham New Street (12th); London Bridge (15th); and London Victoria (20th).

At the other end of the spectrum, Magenta station in Paris achieved the lowest score (41), followed by Nørreport station in Copenhagen and Haussmann-Saint-Lazare in Paris.

Many of the French capital’s stations ranked poorly due to the high number of strike days affecting travel.

“Train travel has received a more important role in Europe in recent years,” said the CCC. 

“Policy makers and consumers have oriented toward train travel as a means of reducing carbon emissions. 

“While we at the Consumer Choice Center stand for choice and technology neutrality, we want to use the rise of interest in long distance train travel as an opportunity to show which railway stations in Europe are the most convenient for travellers.”

The CCC attributed St Pancras’ win to its low number of strike days, high passenger convenience and international connectivity.

“The fact that it also hosts the longest champagne bar in Europe did not influence this ranking,” it added.

Europe’s 10 best train stations

  1. St Pancras, London, UK
  2. Zürich Central Station, Zurich, Switzerland
  3. Leipzig Central Station, Leipzig, Germany
  4. Roma Termini, Rome, Italy
  5. München Central Station, Munich, Germany
  6. Hamburg Central Station, Hamburg, Germany
  7. Berlin Central Station, Berlin, Germany
  8. Milan Central Station, Milan, Italy
  9. Moscow Kazansky, Moscow, Russia
  10. Frankfurt Central Station, Frankfurt, Germany

Europe’s 10 worst train stations

  1. Magenta, Paris, France 
  2. Nørreport, Copenhagen, Denmark 
  3. Haussmann-Saint-Lazare, Paris, France
  4. Châtelet–Les Halles, Paris, France
  5. Torino Porta Nuova, Turin, Italy
  6. Oslo Central Station, Oslo, Norway
  7. Dortmund Central Station, Dortmund, Germany
  8. Berlin Friedrichstrasse, Berlin, Germany
  9. Wien Mitte, Vienna, Austria
  10. Helsinki Central Station, Helsinki, Finland

Originally published here.

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