fbpx

Riforma legale

Il Congresso vuole copiare alcune delle peggiori regole alimentari dell'UE. È una cattiva idea

There is simply no argument in favor of copying EU food regulations.

Legislation looming in the US Congress could emulate European food standards by copying European agricultural regulation. PATTA (Protect America’s Children from Toxic Pesticides Act), legislation sponsored by Senators Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, and Bernie Sanders would outlaw any pesticide that is illegal in either European Union member states, the European Union itself, or Canada.

To many Americans, Europe represents the epitome of culinary civilization, and it’s true that Italian standards for pasta, French standard for bread, and Spanish standards for seafood often far outrank what the average restaurant will serve in the United States. But with that said, we shouldn’t confuse the presence of prime cooking schools in France with a better food market. Europe’s increasing hostility towards crop protection in the form of pesticides is not going to do itself any favors.

A cornerstone of the EU’s continuous ambitions to revamp its food regulation is the “Farm to Fork Strategy,” known as F2F. This strategy, which is part of the “European Green Deal,” is a roadmap for a set of package bills set to hit the EU’s legislature in the coming years. Two of its cornerstone proposals are a reduction of pesticides by 50 percent by 2030, and increasing organic food production to 25 percent by 2030 (it is currently at about 8 percent).

The European Commission has yet to release an impact assessment on what the Farm to Fork strategy would mean for farmers and consumers. Despite repeated calls from EU parliamentarians, it has been unable to provide hard numbers backing up the political argument that these environmental reforms would also be good economically. Thankfully, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) did its own study. In fact, when the USDA made an impact assessment, it found that, if implemented, F2F would result in a 12 percent reduction in agricultural production in Europe and increase the prices of consumer goods by 17 percent in the EU, by 5 percent in the US, and by 9 percent worldwide.

In addition, the USDA also found that in the adoption scenario, trade flows would be reduced, and that Europe’s GDP would decline significantly as result of the increase in food commodity prices (Europe’s GDP decline would represent 76 percent of the overall global GDP decline as a result of F2F).

Developing nations would also be hard hit. Because as a result of these stringent food rules, the EU would implement protectionist measures.

“By 2030, the number of food-insecure people in the case of EU-only adoption would increase by an additional 22 million more than projected without the EC’s proposed Strategies,” USDA concluso.

You could ask why it all matters, since Europeans do pay less for food that apparently is also cooked better. It is true that grocery shopping in Germany can be quite eye-opening to Americans—a pound of wild-caught smoked salmon costs anywhere between $10 and $20 in America (or more), while in Germany those prices vary between $2 and $10. Most of that is because the United States does not shower its farmers and fishers with the same lavish farm subsidies that Europe does. While the US also subsidies farmers, research shows that Europe “out-subsidises” the States by a long shot. So while supermarket prices are lower for consumers, it’s the tax returns of Europeans that tell the real story. In countries such as Belgium, effective income tax rates (with social security) are upwards of 50 percent. In fact, single Belgian workers are the highest taxed in the entire OECD, and they are closely followed by those in Germany and France, both nearing the 50 percent mark. And this doesn’t even go into detail of how the European Union uses its farm subsidies to undercut producers in developing markets and, as the New York Times put it, how oligarchs milk these millions of farm subsidies for their own benefit.

Reducing pesticides by political decree rather than through innovative technology is a non-scientific approach. If the argument of the European Union were that with modern farm equipment, such as smart-sprays, the amount of pesticides could be reduced because farmers are able to make their use more efficient, then that would be a forward-thinking approach. Instead, the 50 percent reduction target looks good on a poster, but has little to do with evidence-based policy making. After all: if the existing 100 percent are bad for human health, why only restrict 50 percent, and not the entirety of all these substances?

Incidentally that is what the EU did on a large scale with neonicotinoids, by banning certain ones for farming use. Neonicotinoids, or neonics, are insecticides that are essential for farmers not to lose a significant amount of their crops each season. In December last year, the French parliament voted for a three year suspension of the ban on neonics, because sugar beet farmers were risking going completely out of business over crop losses. The bans exist in Europe because neonics have been accused of harming pollinators.

The “Bee-pocalypse” in the early 2000s was blamed first on GMOs, then subsequently on neonics when the GMO argument was quickly found to be false. But neonics also aren’t at fault. Bee colony reductions and disappearances occur naturally and periodically throughout history. In fact, there were sporadic bee colony declines all throughout (recorded) history, namely the 19th and 20th century, before neonics were first introduced in 1985. In fact, not only are bees not affected by neonics, they aren’t even declining.

Come la Washington Post reported in two separate articles in 2015—”Call Off the Bee-pocalypse: U.S. Honeybee Colonies Hit a 20-Year High" e "Believe It of Not, the Bees Are Doing Just Fine,” the hysteria of global bee declines are simply inaccurate. You can even do this for yourself: visit the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization’s (FAO) website, select “beehives” in the visualised data section, and click on any country or region you like. Most countries and regions have a steady upwards trend in the prevalence of bees. In the United States, the bee population is actually set to double in the coming years compared to the 1960s level.

So why lie about it? Why is it such a prevalent narrative that GMOs (or any given pesticide of the day) kill the bees? The argument is politically convenient, but not scientifically sound. In Europe, the enemies of modern agriculture have a view of the world that does not match the society of comfort and availability. The EU’s Green Deal Commissioner Frans Timmermans bemoaned in May last year (mind you this is at the height of the first COVID-19 lockdown) that “we’ve gotten used to food being too cheap.”

He didn’t mean that agriculture subsidies were out of proportion, but rather that being able to buy meat or fish on any given day and for low prices were problematic in nature. For a man paid $30,000 a month for his Commission job, while Romanian consumers paid upwards of 20 percent of their income on food, that’s the definition of tone-deaf.

In the United States, availability and competition are key. Also, while Europe’s dreams of a world where nature politely sends no insects to eat our crops, no mold to befall food stocks, and where no other natural conditions could endanger food security, the United States has always enabled scientific innovation. Case in point, the US is far ahead on developing genetic engineering, while Europe lags behind.

There is simply no argument in favor of copying EU food regulations.

Originariamente pubblicato qui

Le cause per molestie pubbliche soffocano l'innovazione e alla fine i consumatori pagano il conto

With arcane rule changes and different policies on absentee voting, we are bracing for lawsuits and recounts that could keep both presidential candidates’ legal teams busy until New Year’s. For once, thankfully, it will not be Florida’s fault.

This is another reminder of how much we have allowed our country to be captured by the legal profession. Whether it’s elections, climate change or the latest corporate scandal, lawsuits have become as American as apple pie.

In the past year alone, personal injury or tort lawsuits have risen more than 7 percent to a whopping 73,000 a year, secondo to the Department of Justice.

One surprising legal principle that has helped fuel these cases is “public nuisance.”

In the past few decades, plaintiffs’ attorneys have expanded the claim of public nuisance — meant to cover pollution or obstructions that cause harm to property — to include widespread social problems such as climate change and opioid addiction.

The goal is to extract large paydays from firms because of either real or perceived damage. Most companies would rather settle than be publicly dragged by the media. Just ask Elon Musk.

There are, no doubt, legitimate cases where real harm has been done. But many of these cases stem from complex issues that require public-policy solutions rather than judicial rulings, which distort our legal system and set dangerous precedents.

Originally, public nuisance was invoked as a way for local governments to protect the public’s right to access public roads, local parks, and waterways, or to halt domestic disturbances like prostitution or gambling.

But recently, state and local courts have been more open to looser interpretations of public nuisances, leading to gross abuses of our already overly litigious justice system.

For example, in 2000, attorneys went to localities in California to sign on as plaintiffs in a massive lead-paint lawsuit. The claim was that lead paint, later known to be dangerous, was “aggressively marketed” by the producers, constituting a public nuisance.

Over $1 billion was ordered to be paid to the California cities and counties, eventually reduced to $305 million in a settlement. Trial lawyers pocketed $65 million, and judges became empowered to use the law to address larger societal problems. Then came the opioid crisis.

In 2019, Oklahoma used the state’s overly broad public-nuisance statute to sue companies that marketed and distributed opioids. While other drugmakers settled, Johnson & Johnson went to trial. Even with a small share of the opioid market and no causal link found between its products and widespread opioid addiction, they were ordered to pay $572 million in damages, of which $85 million went to the lawyers.

From svapare a plastics to environmental cleanups, the public nuisance legal strategy has increasingly become an effective and profitable way to skip the legislative process and push political agendas against innovation.

Environmental foundations, including one headed by Mike Bloomberg, have funded lawyers and activists to recruit governments to join cause legali against energy companies for climate change. These attorneys then seek friendly courts where public-nuisance statutes exist or where activist judges are willing to embrace this legal theory.

Some judges have dismissed these public-nuisance claims, ruling that energy producers have contributed significantly to our economic development. But federal appeals courts have allowed California cities, as well as the city of Baltimore, to advance their cases against fossil-fuel producers. And more could be coming.

This trend shows how our legal system is being used to advance anti-innovation political agendas.

This makes our legal system unpredictable, undermines the rule of law and increases the cost of doing business as companies must prepare for future lawsuits, whether they caused any actual harm or not. All of that ends up increasing prices for all consumers. We need smart and better policies, not more lawsuits.

Yaël Ossowski è vicedirettore del Consumer Choice Center.

Originariamente pubblicato qui.

Le cause per molestie pubbliche soffocano l'innovazione e alla fine i consumatori pagano il conto

With arcane rule changes and different policies on absentee voting, we are bracing for lawsuits and recounts that could keep both presidential candidates’ legal teams busy until New Year’s. For once, thankfully, it will not be Florida’s fault.

This is another reminder of how much we have allowed our country to be captured by the legal profession. Whether it’s elections, climate change or the latest corporate scandal, lawsuits have become as American as apple pie.

In the past year alone, personal injury or tort lawsuits have risen more than 7 percent to a whopping 73,000 a year, secondo to the Department of Justice.

One surprising legal principle that has helped fuel these cases is “public nuisance.”

In the past few decades, plaintiffs’ attorneys have expanded the claim of public nuisance — meant to cover pollution or obstructions that cause harm to property — to include widespread social problems such as climate change and opioid addiction.

The goal is to extract large paydays from firms because of either real or perceived damage. Most companies would rather settle than be publicly dragged by the media. Just ask Elon Musk.

There are, no doubt, legitimate cases where real harm has been done. But many of these cases stem from complex issues that require public-policy solutions rather than judicial rulings, which distort our legal system and set dangerous precedents.

Originally, public nuisance was invoked as a way for local governments to protect the public’s right to access public roads, local parks, and waterways, or to halt domestic disturbances like prostitution or gambling.

But recently, state and local courts have been more open to looser interpretations of public nuisances, leading to gross abuses of our already overly litigious justice system.

For example, in 2000, attorneys went to localities in California to sign on as plaintiffs in a massive lead-paint lawsuit. The claim was that lead paint, later known to be dangerous, was “aggressively marketed” by the producers, constituting a public nuisance.

Over $1 billion was ordered to be paid to the California cities and counties, eventually reduced to $305 million in a settlement. Trial lawyers pocketed $65 million, and judges became empowered to use the law to address larger societal problems. Then came the opioid crisis.

In 2019, Oklahoma used the state’s overly broad public-nuisance statute to sue companies that marketed and distributed opioids. While other drugmakers settled, Johnson & Johnson went to trial. Even with a small share of the opioid market and no causal link found between its products and widespread opioid addiction, they were ordered to pay $572 million in damages, of which $85 million went to the lawyers.

From svapare a plastics to environmental cleanups, the public nuisance legal strategy has increasingly become an effective and profitable way to skip the legislative process and push political agendas against innovation.

Environmental foundations, including one headed by Mike Bloomberg, have funded lawyers and activists to recruit governments to join cause legali against energy companies for climate change. These attorneys then seek friendly courts where public-nuisance statutes exist or where activist judges are willing to embrace this legal theory.

Some judges have dismissed these public-nuisance claims, ruling that energy producers have contributed significantly to our economic development. But federal appeals courts have allowed California cities, as well as the city of Baltimore, to advance their cases against fossil-fuel producers. And more could be coming.

This trend shows how our legal system is being used to advance anti-innovation political agendas.

This makes our legal system unpredictable, undermines the rule of law and increases the cost of doing business as companies must prepare for future lawsuits, whether they caused any actual harm or not. All of that ends up increasing prices for all consumers. We need smart and better policies, not more lawsuits.

Yaël Ossowski è vicedirettore del Consumer Choice Center.

Originariamente pubblicato qui.

Il coronavirus farà esplodere il nostro sistema legale, ma uno scudo di responsabilità aiuterà

Mentre i clienti tornano lentamente nei negozi e i lavoratori tornano a colpire le attività riaperte, c'è un pensiero in tutte le nostre menti: cautela.

Scudi e schermi protettivi in plastica, mascherine e guanti sono una nuova realtà, ed è un piccolo prezzo da pagare per uscire dai blocchi imposti dallo stato.

Ma mesi dopo l'onnicomprensiva pandemia di coronavirus, c'è un altro costo che molti imprenditori e amministratori temono: le future spese legali.

Mentre le precauzioni volontarie saranno abbondanti in ogni situazione in cui un cliente, studente o lavoratore sta tornando nel mondo, la natura del virus significa che è quasi certo che qualcuno, da qualche parte, prenderà il virus. Ciò significa enormi potenziali ramificazioni legali se una persona vuole ritenere responsabile un'istituzione o un'azienda.

C'è già un'epidemia di azioni legali dimostrabile. Tra marzo e maggio di quest'anno, sono state avviate più di 2.400 cause legali relative a COVID archiviato nei tribunali federali e statali. È probabile che questi casi facciano saltare in aria il nostro sistema legale così come lo conosciamo, sollevando accuse di colpa e intasando ogni livello dei nostri tribunali che terranno occupati giudici e avvocati per un po' di tempo.

Ecco perché ha preso piede l'idea di uno scudo di responsabilità per scuole, imprese e organizzazioni.

In un recente lettera ai leader del Congresso, 21 governatori, tutti repubblicani, hanno invitato entrambe le camere del Congresso a includere protezioni di responsabilità nel prossimo round di aiuti per il coronavirus.

“Per accelerare la riapertura delle nostre economie nel modo più rapido e sicuro possibile, dobbiamo consentire ai cittadini di tornare ai propri mezzi di sussistenza e guadagnarsi da vivere per le proprie famiglie senza la minaccia di frivole azioni legali”, hanno scritto i governatori.

Sebbene uno scudo di responsabilità non fornisca copertura alle istituzioni che sono negligenti o sconsiderate, e ragionevolmente, garantirebbe che le azioni legali palesemente frivole o infondate non possano andare avanti.

Per l'imprenditore medio o l'amministratore scolastico, ciò aiuterebbe ad alleviare alcune delle preoccupazioni che tengono chiuse o severamente limitate molte di queste istruzioni.

Nessuno vuole che clienti o lavoratori prendano il virus in questi ambienti, ma la creazione di zone prive di COVID al 100% sarebbe quasi impossibile, un fatto che molti scienziati stanno pronto riconoscere. Ecco perché i governatori statali, i legislatori e gli imprenditori vogliono garantire che i nostri stati possano riaprire, ma siano consapevoli del rischio.

C'è ancora molta incertezza relativa alla trasmissione del virus, come hanno fatto i Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sottolineato, ed è per questo che ha senso uno scudo di responsabilità, almeno per coloro che seguono le raccomandazioni in materia di salute e sicurezza. Tuttavia, le imprese e le scuole che mettono intenzionalmente in pericolo i cittadini per negligenza dovrebbero essere giustamente ritenute responsabili.

Questa è l'idea attualmente in discussione nella capitale della nazione, come hanno fatto i repubblicani del Senato ha dichiarato vogliono uno scudo di responsabilità per evitare il contagio di una causa.

Sfortunatamente, è probabile che l'idea sia impantanata in una tossica spirale di morte partigiana. Il leader della minoranza al Senato Chuck Schumer di New York denuncia un piano del genere come "immunità legale per le grandi società" e la cronaca sull'argomento ha assomigliato a tale.

Ma queste protezioni andrebbero maggiormente a vantaggio delle piccole imprese e delle scuole che seguono le raccomandazioni sanitarie e si trovano ancora oggetto di azioni legali.

Non è un segreto che molti avvocati vedano un potenziale giorno di paga sulla scia della pandemia. Ci sono già centinaia degli studi legali che propongono "avvocati di coronavirus" e molti hanno riassegnato interi team e dipartimenti per concentrarsi sulla fornitura di consulenza legale e consulenza per casi COVID-19.

E proprio come nei casi di frode ai consumatori prima della pandemia, uno strumento preferito degli avvocati per danni causati dal coronavirus saranno le grandi azioni legali collettive che cercano enormi pagamenti. Questi sono i casi che di solito finiscono per riempire le tasche degli studi legali invece che dei querelanti legittimamente danneggiati, come un recente Jones Day rapporto trova. E questo non parla nemmeno del merito o meno di questi casi.

Nel discutere il prossimo livello di sollievo dalla pandemia per gli americani, incluso uno scudo di responsabilità sarebbe una grande misura di fiducia per le imprese e le istituzioni responsabili e caute nel nostro paese.

Che si tratti del college o del panificio della comunità locale, dobbiamo tutti riconoscere che l'assegnazione della colpa per la contrazione del virus sarà un frequente argomento di preoccupazione. Ma quelle accuse devono essere fondate, ed essere il risultato di un comportamento assolutamente dannoso e negligente, non solo perché gli studenti sono tornati in classe oi clienti stanno di nuovo comprando torte.

Uno scudo di responsabilità per i cittadini responsabili del nostro Paese è non solo una buona idea ma necessaria.

Originariamente pubblicato qui.


Il Consumer Choice Center è il gruppo di difesa dei consumatori che sostiene la libertà di stile di vita, l'innovazione, la privacy, la scienza e la scelta dei consumatori. Le principali aree politiche su cui ci concentriamo sono il digitale, la mobilità, lo stile di vita e i beni di consumo e la salute e la scienza.

Il CCC rappresenta i consumatori in oltre 100 paesi in tutto il mondo. Monitoriamo da vicino le tendenze normative a Ottawa, Washington, Bruxelles, Ginevra e altri punti caldi della regolamentazione e informiamo e attiviamo i consumatori a lottare per #ConsumerChoice. Ulteriori informazioni su consumerchoicecenter.org

Il disegno di legge del GOP scoraggerebbe le frivole cause legali contro COVID

Mentre i clienti tornano lentamente nei negozi e i lavoratori tornano a colpire le attività riaperte, un pensiero domina tutte le nostre menti: cautela.

Scudi e schermi protettivi in plastica, mascherine e guanti sono una nuova realtà, ed è un piccolo prezzo da pagare per uscire dai blocchi imposti dallo stato. Ma mesi dopo l'onnicomprensiva pandemia di coronavirus, c'è un altro costo che molti imprenditori e amministratori temono: le future spese legali.

Mentre le precauzioni volontarie saranno abbondanti in ogni situazione in cui un cliente, studente o lavoratore sta tornando nel mondo, la natura del virus significa che è quasi certo che qualcuno, da qualche parte, prenderà il virus. Ciò significa enormi potenziali ramificazioni legali se una persona vuole ritenere responsabile un'istituzione o un'azienda.

Esiste già un'epidemia dimostrabile di cause legali. Tra marzo e maggio di quest'anno, oltre 2.400 cause legali relative al COVID sono state intentate nei tribunali federali e statali. È probabile che questi casi facciano saltare in aria il sistema legale così come lo conosciamo, sollevando accuse di colpa, intasando ogni livello dei nostri tribunali e tenendo occupati giudici e avvocati per un po' di tempo.

Ecco perché ha preso piede l'idea di uno scudo di responsabilità per scuole, imprese e organizzazioni. In una recente lettera ai leader del Congresso, 21 governatori, tutti repubblicani, hanno invitato entrambe le camere del Congresso a includere protezioni di responsabilità nel prossimo ciclo di aiuti per il coronavirus.

“Per accelerare la riapertura delle nostre economie nel modo più rapido e sicuro possibile, dobbiamo consentire ai cittadini di tornare ai propri mezzi di sussistenza e guadagnarsi da vivere per le proprie famiglie senza la minaccia di frivole azioni legali”, hanno scritto i governatori.

Mentre uno scudo di responsabilità lo farà non fornire copertura a istituzioni negligenti o sconsiderate e, ragionevolmente, assicurerebbe che le azioni legali palesemente frivole o infondate non possano andare avanti. Per l'imprenditore medio o l'amministratore scolastico, ciò aiuterebbe ad alleviare alcune delle preoccupazioni che tengono chiuse o severamente limitate molte istituzioni e imprese.

Nessuno vuole che clienti o lavoratori prendano il virus in questi ambienti, ma creare zone prive di COVID al 100% sarebbe quasi impossibile, un fatto che molti scienziati sono pronti a riconoscere. Ecco perché i governatori statali, i legislatori e gli imprenditori vogliono garantire che i nostri stati possano riaprirsi, pur essendo consapevoli del rischio.

C'è ancora molta incertezza relativa alla trasmissione del virus, come hanno sottolineato i Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ed è per questo che ha senso uno scudo di responsabilità, almeno per coloro che seguono le raccomandazioni in materia di salute e sicurezza. Le imprese e le scuole che intenzionalmente mettono in pericolo i cittadini per negligenza, tuttavia, dovrebbero essere legittimamente ritenute responsabili. Questa è l'idea attualmente in discussione nella capitale della nazione, poiché i repubblicani del Senato hanno dichiarato di volere uno scudo di responsabilità per evitare il contagio di una causa.

Sfortunatamente, è probabile che l'idea sia impantanata in una tossica spirale di morte partigiana. Il leader della minoranza al Senato Chuck Schumer di New York denuncia un tale piano come "immunità legale per le grandi società" e i rapporti nazionali sull'argomento lo hanno suggerito.

Ma queste protezioni andrebbero maggiormente a vantaggio delle piccole imprese e delle scuole che seguono le raccomandazioni sanitarie e si trovano ancora oggetto di azioni legali. Non è un segreto che molti avvocati vedano un potenziale giorno di paga sulla scia della pandemia. Già centinaia di studi legali stanno proponendo "avvocati di coronavirus".

E proprio come nei casi di frode ai consumatori prima della pandemia, uno strumento preferito degli avvocati per danni causati dal coronavirus saranno le grandi azioni legali collettive che cercano enormi pagamenti. Questi sono i casi che di solito finiscono per riempire le tasche degli studi legali invece che dei querelanti legittimamente danneggiati, come rileva un recente rapporto dello studio legale Jones Day. E questo non parla nemmeno del merito o meno di questi casi.

Che si tratti del college o del panificio della comunità locale, dobbiamo tutti riconoscere che l'assegnazione della colpa per la contrazione del virus sarà un frequente argomento di preoccupazione. Ma quelle accuse devono essere fondate, ed essere il risultato di un comportamento assolutamente dannoso e negligente, non solo perché gli studenti sono tornati in classe oi clienti stanno ancora una volta comprando torte. Uno scudo di responsabilità per i cittadini responsabili del nostro Paese è non solo una buona idea ma necessaria.

Yaël Ossowski è vicedirettore del Consumer Choice Center. Questo articolo è stato pubblicato nel Waco Tribune-Herald.

LE IMPRESE E LE SCUOLE RESPONSABILI HANNO BISOGNO DI SCUDI DI RESPONSABILITÀ COVID-19

A Liability Shield For Small Businesses And Schools

Part of this proposal is a liability shield for small businesses and schools, to protect them from unreasonable lawsuits related to COVID-19.

Consumer Choice Center Deputy Director Yaël Ossowski responded: “The nature of the virus means it is almost certain that someone, somewhere, will catch the virus. That means huge potential legal ramifications if a person wants to hold an institution or business liable,” he wrote in the Detroit Times.

“There is already a demonstrable lawsuit epidemic. These cases are likely to blow up our legal system as we know it, elevating accusations of blame and clogging every level of our courts that will keep judges and lawyers busy for some time.

“That’s why responsible businesses and schools that follow federal recommendations on health and safety should not be subject to outrageous cause legali that bring our society to a halt,” said Ossowski. “Only legitimate lawsuits, based on some measure of negligence or recklessness, should be heard in our nation’s courts.”

“For the average entrepreneur or school administrator, a liability shield would help alleviate some of the worries that are keeping many of these institutions closed or severely restricted,” he added.

“Stopping the coming wave of unfounded and frivolous lawsuits will be important if we want to actually identify citizens and consumatori who have been harmed by institutions that have not taken the right precautions. That’s why a liability shield is necessary for getting our country back on the right track,” concluded Ossowski.

Learn more about Consumer Choice Center’s #LegalReform campaign qui

Originariamente pubblicato qui.


Il Consumer Choice Center è il gruppo di difesa dei consumatori che sostiene la libertà di stile di vita, l'innovazione, la privacy, la scienza e la scelta dei consumatori. Le principali aree politiche su cui ci concentriamo sono il digitale, la mobilità, lo stile di vita e i beni di consumo e la salute e la scienza.

Il CCC rappresenta i consumatori in oltre 100 paesi in tutto il mondo. Monitoriamo da vicino le tendenze normative a Ottawa, Washington, Bruxelles, Ginevra e altri punti caldi della regolamentazione e informiamo e attiviamo i consumatori a lottare per #ConsumerChoice. Ulteriori informazioni su consumerchoicecenter.org

Le aziende responsabili hanno bisogno di protezioni contro la responsabilità COVID-19

Mentre i clienti tornano lentamente nei negozi e i lavoratori tornano a colpire le attività riaperte, c'è un pensiero in tutte le nostre menti: cautela.

Scudi e schermi protettivi in plastica, mascherine e guanti sono una nuova realtà, ed è un piccolo prezzo da pagare per uscire dai blocchi imposti dallo stato.

Ma mesi dopo l'onnicomprensiva pandemia di coronavirus, c'è un altro costo che molti imprenditori e amministratori temono: le future spese legali. 

Mentre le precauzioni volontarie saranno abbondanti in ogni situazione in cui un cliente, studente o lavoratore sta tornando nel mondo, la natura del virus significa che è quasi certo che qualcuno, da qualche parte, prenderà il virus. Ciò significa enormi potenziali ramificazioni legali se una persona vuole ritenere responsabile un'istituzione o un'azienda.

In questa foto d'archivio del 15 aprile 2020, due persone passano davanti a un cartello chiuso in un negozio al dettaglio a Chicago. Nam Y. Huh, AP

C'è già un'epidemia di azioni legali dimostrabile. Tra marzo e maggio di quest'anno, oltre 2.400 cause legali relative al COVID sono state intentate nei tribunali federali e statali. È probabile che questi casi facciano saltare in aria il nostro sistema legale così come lo conosciamo, sollevando accuse di colpa e intasando ogni livello dei nostri tribunali che terranno occupati giudici e avvocati per un po' di tempo.

Ecco perché ha preso piede l'idea di uno scudo di responsabilità per scuole, imprese e organizzazioni.

In una recente lettera ai leader del Congresso, 21 governatori, tutti repubblicani, hanno invitato entrambe le camere del Congresso a includere protezioni di responsabilità nel prossimo ciclo di aiuti per il coronavirus.

“Per accelerare la riapertura delle nostre economie nel modo più rapido e sicuro possibile, dobbiamo consentire ai cittadini di tornare ai propri mezzi di sussistenza e guadagnarsi da vivere per le proprie famiglie senza la minaccia di frivole azioni legali”, hanno scritto i governatori.

Sebbene uno scudo di responsabilità non fornisca copertura alle istituzioni che sono negligenti o sconsiderate, e ragionevolmente, garantirebbe che le azioni legali palesemente frivole o infondate non possano andare avanti.

Per l'imprenditore medio o l'amministratore scolastico, ciò aiuterebbe ad alleviare alcune delle preoccupazioni che tengono chiuse o severamente limitate molte di queste istituzioni.

Nessuno vuole che clienti o lavoratori prendano il virus in questi ambienti, ma creare zone 100% COVID-free sarebbe quasi impossibile, un fatto che molti scienziati sono pronti a riconoscere. Ecco perché i governatori statali, i legislatori e gli imprenditori vogliono garantire che i nostri stati possano riaprire, ma siano consapevoli del rischio. 

C'è ancora molta incertezza relativa alla trasmissione del virus, come hanno sottolineato i Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ed è per questo che ha senso uno scudo di responsabilità, almeno per coloro che seguono le raccomandazioni in materia di salute e sicurezza. Tuttavia, le imprese e le scuole che mettono intenzionalmente in pericolo i cittadini per negligenza dovrebbero essere giustamente ritenute responsabili.

Questa è l'idea attualmente in discussione nella capitale della nazione, poiché i repubblicani del Senato hanno dichiarato di volere uno scudo di responsabilità per evitare il contagio di una causa.

Sfortunatamente, è probabile che l'idea sia impantanata in una tossica spirale di morte partigiana. Il leader della minoranza al Senato Chuck Schumer di New York denuncia un piano del genere come "immunità legale per le grandi società" e la cronaca sull'argomento ha assomigliato a tale. 

Ma queste protezioni andrebbero maggiormente a vantaggio delle piccole imprese e delle scuole che seguono le raccomandazioni sanitarie e si trovano ancora oggetto di azioni legali. 

Non è un segreto che molti avvocati vedano un potenziale giorno di paga sulla scia della pandemia. Ci sono già molti studi legali che propongono "avvocati di coronavirus" e molti hanno riassegnato interi team e dipartimenti per concentrarsi sulla fornitura di consulenza legale e consulenza per i casi di COVID-19. 

E proprio come nei casi di frode dei consumatori prima della pandemia, uno strumento preferito degli avvocati per danni causati dal coronavirus saranno le grandi azioni legali collettive che cercano enormi pagamenti. Questi sono i casi che di solito finiscono per riempire le tasche degli studi legali invece che dei querelanti legittimamente danneggiati, come rileva un recente rapporto di Jones Day. E questo non parla nemmeno del merito o meno di questi casi.

Nel discutere il prossimo livello di sollievo dalla pandemia per gli americani, incluso uno scudo di responsabilità sarebbe una grande misura di fiducia per le imprese e le istituzioni responsabili e caute nel nostro paese. 

Che si tratti del college o del panificio della comunità locale, dobbiamo tutti riconoscere che l'assegnazione della colpa per la contrazione del virus sarà un frequente argomento di preoccupazione. Ma quelle accuse devono essere fondate, ed essere il risultato di un comportamento assolutamente dannoso e negligente, non solo perché gli studenti sono tornati in classe oi clienti stanno di nuovo comprando torte.

Uno scudo di responsabilità per i cittadini responsabili del nostro Paese è non solo una buona idea ma necessaria.

Originariamente pubblicato sul Detroit Times qui.


Il Consumer Choice Center è il gruppo di difesa dei consumatori che sostiene la libertà di stile di vita, l'innovazione, la privacy, la scienza e la scelta dei consumatori. Le principali aree politiche su cui ci concentriamo sono il digitale, la mobilità, lo stile di vita e i beni di consumo e la salute e la scienza.

Il CCC rappresenta i consumatori in oltre 100 paesi in tutto il mondo. Monitoriamo da vicino le tendenze normative a Ottawa, Washington, Bruxelles, Ginevra e altri punti caldi della regolamentazione e informiamo e attiviamo i consumatori a lottare per #ConsumerChoice. Ulteriori informazioni su consumerchoicecenter.org

Avvocati di responsabilità civile bruciati si dichiarano colpevoli di racket di estorsioni da $200 milioni

Alla fine dell'anno scorso, noi coperto il procedimento penale contro l'avvocato con sede in Virginia Timothy Litzenburg e i suoi partner.

È stato accusato di essersi avvicinato a una società agrochimica internazionale, presumibilmente Bayer, la società madre della Monsanto, e di aver minacciato di armare i media e i tribunali contro di loro a meno che non avessero dato al suo studio legale $200 milioni.

L'obiettivo era utilizzare i recenti verdetti per affermare che il glifosato, un ingrediente chiave del Roundup della Monsanto, è un pericoloso cancerogeno, anche se centinaia di studi da organismi rispettabili, inclusa la FDA, hanno affermato che non ci sono prove per tale affermazione.

In tribunale, è stato rivelato che l'azienda di Litzenburg ha minacciato la Monsanto proponendo loro un massiccio "accordo di consulenza" che avrebbe invalidato i futuri casi contro di loro dall'azienda a causa del conflitto di interessi. La speranza era che la società si tirasse indietro e gli avvocati se la cavassero con un enorme giorno di paga.

Venerdì scorso, Timothy Litzenburg, di Charlottesville, e il suo partner, Daniel Kincheloe ciascuno dichiarato colpevole all'estorsione dopo un breve processo. Dovranno affrontare la condanna a settembre.

Litzenburg e Kincheloe hanno anche ammesso che dopo aver richiesto $200 milioni alla società, hanno registrato una società della Virginia allo scopo di ricevere denaro dalla società e che hanno accettato di dividere i fondi tra loro e i loro associati e di non distribuire tutto il denaro che la società ha pagato loro come presunte "commissioni di consulenza" ai loro clienti esistenti. Litzenburg e Kincheloe hanno ammesso che dopo aver richiesto $200 milioni, Litzenburg ha minacciato che loro e altri avrebbero avviato un contenzioso che sarebbe diventato "un problema in corso e in crescita esponenziale per [Società 1], in particolare quando i media inevitabilmente se ne accorgono[,]" e che tale contenzioso costerebbe alla Società 1 e alla sua società madre quotata in borsa "miliardi, mettendo da parte il relativo calo del prezzo delle azioni e il danno alla reputazione".

WHSV

Questo caso è importante perché rimuove alcuni strati del sistema legale per illeciti o lesioni personali estremamente complicato della nostra nazione, un ciclone pernicioso di minacce velate, milioni di dollari, standard non etici e enormi accordi con avvocati che spesso lasciano nella polvere i querelanti veramente feriti.

Gli incentivi che esistono nel sistema legale americano consentono praticamente a qualsiasi studio legale di inventare un caso contro società o individui. Spesso le aziende scelgono di risolvere questi casi per importi elevati piuttosto che fare pubblicità al caso, anche se non si sono verificati danni o lesioni reali.

In un certo senso, più grande è un'azienda, più è probabile che abbia un bersaglio alle spalle, indipendentemente dall'affermazione sollevata in tribunale.

Sebbene ci siano molti casi di illeciti legittimi in cui le persone sono state danneggiate, ce ne sono altrettanti che sono semplicemente frivoli e non hanno alcun merito legale. Basti pensare ai vari casi contro Google Maps perché le persone hanno preso a percorso sbagliato e sono stati investiti da un'auto, o contro Burger King perché sono hamburger senza carne non lo sono veramente “vegano”.

Poiché il numero di casi che possono essere ascoltati da giudici e giurie è limitato in un dato anno, l'esistenza di questi tipi di casi significa che altri casi, con vere gravidanze, non verranno ascoltati.

E anche se i casi con danni reali alla fine venissero portati in tribunale, è molto probabile che i querelanti riceveranno solo una frazione della loro meritata restituzione.

È un sistema che avvantaggia in modo schiacciante gli avvocati del danno a spese di coloro che dovrebbero rappresentare.

All'inizio di quest'anno, un analisi delle grandi azioni legali collettive compilate dallo studio legale Jones Day hanno rilevato che i membri della classe hanno ricevuto in media solo il 23% degli eventuali pagamenti - a volte nell'ordine di miliardi di dollari - e quasi i due terzi sono andati invece direttamente agli avvocati.

Questi grandi accordi finiscono per costare alle aziende e ai consumatori che soffrono di prezzi più elevati, per non parlare delle centinaia di potenziali attori che non sono in grado di far sentire rapidamente le loro cause civili.

L'America ama le cause. Allora perché non puoi citare in giudizio un poliziotto per forza eccessiva?

In tutto il paese, persone di ogni provenienza sono nelle strade per chiedere giustizia.

Si sentono delusi dalle loro istituzioni, dalle loro città e dalla loro nazione. Non hanno torto. La scioccante morte di George Floyd a Minneapolis ha risvegliato molti americani alle pressanti questioni della responsabilità della polizia e della giustizia razziale.

Per un paese frenetico, si potrebbe pensare che ci sarebbe un numero schiacciante di azioni legali intentate contro agenti di polizia che hanno abusato del loro potere.

Ma non è così, a causa di una dottrina giuridica poco conosciuta chiamata "immunità qualificata". Protegge efficacemente tutti i dipendenti pubblici dall'essere citati in giudizio per le azioni che svolgono sul lavoro.

Una recente indagine della Reuters ha rilevato che l'immunità qualificata è un "fallimento sicuro" per coloro che commettono brutalità della polizia e nega alle vittime di tale violenza i loro diritti costituzionali.

Diversi funzionari eletti a Washington, DC, stanno dando una seconda occhiata a questa politica e la Corte Suprema degli Stati Uniti sta subendo pressioni per riesaminare la questione, anche se i giudici hanno costantemente lo sostenne.

Spogliare questa difesa dagli agenti di polizia che usano la forza eccessiva e mortale nell'esercizio del dovere aiuterebbe a proteggere le vite future e restituirebbe giustizia a coloro che ne hanno più bisogno.

in Florida, tra il 2013 e il 2019, 540 persone sono state uccise in seguito a alterchi con la polizia; Il 31 per cento di loro erano neri, secondo al database di mappatura della violenza della polizia.

A Tampa Bay Times Banca dati ha rilevato che dei 772 incidenti con sparatorie tra ufficiali tra il 2009 e il 2014, ci sono state solo 91 cause legali. Non si sa quanti abbiano portato a accordi significativi che stabiliscono negligenza, ma un database simile a New York mostra che è solo un manciata ogni anno.

Per le famiglie delle vittime innocenti negli alterchi di polizia, vogliamo un sistema legale che non solo possa perseguire e condannare gli agenti che usano la forza eccessiva, ma anche ritenerli responsabili nei tribunali civili.

Dovrebbe essere facile considerando che gli Stati Uniti - e la Florida, in particolare - sono tra i più contenzioso luoghi nel mondo. Ma la maggior parte delle cause civili intentate non si basano sulla negligenza di agenti di polizia o altri dipendenti pubblici, ma contro gli imprenditori da parte di avvocati che rappresentano i consumatori. Questi casi sono spesso frivoli.

Ma spesso diventano grandi azioni legali collettive che richiedono tempo e risorse straordinari nei tribunali, promettendo enormi risarcimenti agli studi legali citati in giudizio e praticamente nulla per i membri della classe, rallentando nel contempo il perseguimento di illeciti civili che hanno provocato lesioni e Morte.

Un significativo analisi delle grandi azioni legali collettive compilate dallo studio legale Jones Day rileva che i membri della classe hanno ricevuto in media solo il 23 percento degli eventuali pagamenti - a volte nell'ordine di miliardi di dollari - e quasi i due terzi sono andati invece direttamente agli avvocati.

Questi grandi accordi finiscono per costare alle aziende e ai consumatori che soffrono di prezzi più elevati, per non parlare delle centinaia di potenziali attori che non sono in grado di far sentire rapidamente le loro cause civili.

Invece di un sistema giudiziario intasato da cause civili che finiscono per danneggiare i cittadini, che dire di un sistema legale più responsabile che aiuterebbe a fornire giustizia alle vittime e alle famiglie più danneggiate da coloro che dovrebbero proteggerci?

Ecco perché l'immunità qualificata degli agenti di polizia e dei dipendenti pubblici non può essere lasciata in piedi e dobbiamo istituire una riforma legale che aiuti a bilanciare la giustizia nella nostra società.

Questo è il momento giusto per concentrarsi su giustizia e uguaglianza. Rendere il nostro sistema giudiziario più solido e più abile nell'identificare coloro che commettono illeciti civili dovrebbe essere una priorità. Lo dobbiamo a tutte le vittime di violenza ea coloro che meritano la restituzione.

Originariamente pubblicato qui.


Il Consumer Choice Center è il gruppo di difesa dei consumatori che sostiene la libertà di stile di vita, l'innovazione, la privacy, la scienza e la scelta dei consumatori. Le principali aree politiche su cui ci concentriamo sono il digitale, la mobilità, lo stile di vita e i beni di consumo e la salute e la scienza.

Il CCC rappresenta i consumatori in oltre 100 paesi in tutto il mondo. Monitoriamo da vicino le tendenze normative a Ottawa, Washington, Bruxelles, Ginevra e altri punti caldi della regolamentazione e informiamo e attiviamo i consumatori a lottare per #ConsumerChoice. Ulteriori informazioni su consumerchoicecenter.org

Come le cause legali per responsabilità fanno salire i prezzi dei farmaci, soffocano l'innovazione e danneggiano i pazienti

A single drug can cost up to 2 million dollars per treatment. In the light of COVID-19, patient groups and activists have been using the crisis of the moment to call for capping drug and vaccine prices and cracking down on barriers to access for patients. In developing countries, large parts of drug prices are caused by tariffs, taxes, and other regulatory barriers. The United States, on the other hand, has the highest per-capita drug expenditure and drug prices in the world.

Bringing a drug to the US market is usually critical for a company to recoup the roughly 2 billion dollars of development costs per successfully launched medicine. At the same time, the country’s unique legal liability and injury system (called tort law) leads to higher drug prices without necessarily creating benefits for patients. Once a drug has passed the rigorous approval process demonstrating safety and efficacy to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), it is still subject to various liability laws at the state level.

In the last two decades, Pfizer set aside a whopping 21 billion dollars for settlements following tort lawsuits against the diet drug Fen-Phen. Those who were harmed by the drug were able to seek legal recourse. That said, thousands and thousands of people who were not harmed by the drug were also able to seek compensation. So much so that it is assumed that at least 70% of the payouts went to claimants who weren’t harmed at all by the drug.

Johnson & Johnson was ordered to pay 8 billion dollars to one patient for side effects caused by the antipsychotic drug Risperdal. These are just a few examples of a plethora of multi-billion-dollar payments drug companies have been compelled to make after being dragged to court, despite them being deemed safe by the FDA.

Patient advocates who are passionate about lowering drug prices in the USA should take a serious look at liability laws and how their misuse inflates prices. Abolishing liability beyond FDA requirements could reduce drug prices in the United States by 12 to 120 billion dollars a year and therefore give many more patients access to medicines. 

In 2019, US patients spent a total of $360 billion on prescription drugs. Between 3 and 30% of this amount could be freed up for other treatments or price cuts if liability rules for FDA-approved drugs would be reformed. This change might seem radical, but it is what Congress has approvato for FDA-approved medical devices. A similar preemption was extended to vaccines in the late 1980s via the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

Another impact of lawsuits following product withdrawals of FDA-approved drugs is that they negatively affect new investments in development. Pfizer’s settlement for Fen-Phen alone could have been used to bring 10-15 new innovative and life-saving drugs to patients.

Rather than using these financial resources for more research and development, or to lower drug prices, pharmaceutical manufacturers have to fight law firms who enrich themselves by abusing the US tort system. Tort law on top of FDA regulation is not just stifling innovation, but also an expensive way to compensate for the harm caused to patients. Paul H. Rubin suggests that the costs of settlement for the legal process account for half of the total settlement fees. Reducing this burden could increase the speed of new drugs being developed and reduce their price. Critics of tort reform will say that changing liability rules will endanger patients, but that’s far from the truth. A 2007 study shows that tort law reform in some states led to a total of 24,000 fewer deaths due to price reductions and the arrival of new innovative drugs. That’s something to keep in mind.

As long as we keep existing tort law on top of the FDA approval framework, consumers are being de facto forced to pay a massive markup on drugs in order to get insured against potential side effects. This is a very expensive and inefficient way of insuring patients against harm. 

A smarter way of designing such a compensation scheme is to either expand the vaccine compensation scheme to pharmaceuticals or to allow consumers to personally purchase insurance against such damages. This could, for instance, be supplementary insurance on top of the patient’s existing health insurance plans. Such a system would allow patients who opt-in molto inferiore fees than the existing mandatory tort law system.

Exempting drugs from state tort law would be an easy step to reduce drug prices without putting patients under more risk. American patients would save billions a year and be able to access more treatments than they can currently. This will lead to a net benefit for patients and the health of the nation. Why not give it a try?

Descrizione