fbpx

Month: January 2020

Cannabis Conclave 2020 Dubbed The ‘Rebels Of Davos’

Last week, the Cannabis Conclave took place in Davos, Switzerland. The event was dubbed by some as the “rebellious side” of Davos.

The Conclave was hosted by the Consumer Choice Center and Prohibition Partners.

“The event featured industry leaders, investors and policy makers from over 25 different countries. The purpose of the event is to continue to fuel the legalization debate internationally,” David Clement, North American Affairs Manager at Consumer Choice Center, told Benzinga.

Legalizing Cannabis

“Fueling the legalization debate, and the advancement of legalization, requires three things,” Clement said. “First, we need policy makers who are open to the idea, and who realize that the war on drugs is failing. Second, we need entrepreneurs who want to enter the legal space and meet the demand of consumers and patients.”

Clement said the industry needs investors to help catapult it forward so it can expand, and ultimately stamp out the black market.

“That is why we bring those three groups together in Davos. One headline called us the ‘Rebels of Davos,’ explaining that the Cannabis Conclave is the sharper, more daring edge of what goes on during the World Economic Forum,” Clement said.

The team is committed to returning in 2021.

Listen to Yaël Ossowski and Clement on Consumer Choice Radio discuss the Cannabis Conclave further here: https://consumerchoicecenter.org/radio/ep3/

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at 
consumerchoicecenter.org

Davos cannabis conclave advances cause for legalisation

The second annual, premier cannabis industry event – the Cannabis Conclave – returned to Davos this January to bring together industry leaders and policy makers.

This year the Cannabis Conclave brought together cannabis industry executives, global investors, policy makers and international media to fuel the legalisation debate globally, both for recreational and medical cannabis, and to highlight the growing legitimacy and maturity of the legal cannabis industry.

The Consumer Choice Center organised the event that took place in Davos, Switzerland on 23 January, 2020.

Medical Cannabis Network spoke to organiser, David Clement, to find out more.

Cannabis Conclave 2020

As the world’s most influential executives, activists, and change makers descend on Davos, the conclave aimed to bring cannabis to the front and centre of the global discussion.

Clement, North American Affairs Manager with the Consumer Choice Center, said: “Both internationally and domestically, the number one issue is that legislation is not consumer or patient focussed. Legalisation bills, whether medical or recreational, should always be putting access and affordability first. Unfortunately, in many instances this is not the case. It is time for international bodies to realise that the war on drugs is a failure, especially its focus on cannabis.

“I think that countries should be able to craft cannabis regulations to suit their specifics needs. That being said, I’d strongly encourage all governments to abandon the war on drugs and to legalise cannabis.”

The high-end networking that occurs at the conclave ensures the right amount of knowledge sharing for future collaborations, and for smarter consumer focussed policy.

Clements said: “The legitimacy of the industry can be cemented by having additional countries embrace medical and recreational legalisation. Canada, despite its regulatory mistakes, has charted a course for other countries to follow their lead. We are hopeful that as more countries adopt legalisation, that a tipping point internationally is in the near future.”

Cannabis in 2020

2020 has been earmarked as a big year for cannabis – with expectations that both recreational and medicinal cannabis will become much more ‘normalised’.

Clements said: “The big developments for cannabis in 2020 will be new jurisdictions embracing legalisation. We know that Luxembourg and Malta are now currently reviewing what their legalisation process could look like. One big theme from those two countries is the question of how much they will learn from Canada? For example, it is our hope that while embracing legalisation that those two countries avoid over-regulating cannabis like Canada did.

“Having patient friendly and consumer friendly regulations is the only way to ensure that legalisati on is a success, and that the black market is stamped out.”

He added: “One big takeaway from Cannabis Conclave 2020 is that the world is now listening when it comes to cannabis legalisation.”

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at 
consumerchoicecenter.org

Empfehlung von Gen-Editing-Technologie

Während der internationalen Grünen Woche in Berlin hat die deutsche Landwirtschaftsministerin Julia Klockner die Gentechnologie zugelassen. Sie setzte auch ihre Hoffnungen für die Landwirte in die Tat um, um die Genom-Bearbeitung als Mittel für schnelle Innovationen im Bereich der Landwirtschaft und der damit verbundenen Wetterbedingungen zu nutzen.

Der Senior Policy Analyst im Consumer Choice Center, Bill Wirtz, begrüßte die Erklärung als positiven Ansatz für mehrere Verbraucher. Die Gen-Editing-Technologie wie CRISPR bietet eine bedeutende Chance sowohl für die Medizin als auch für die Landwirtschaft. Die Regierungsbehörden auf der ganzen Welt sollten sich an den deutschen Landwirtschaftsminister wenden, der vertritt, dass wissenschaftliche Innovationen auf dem europäischen Kontinent weiterhin akzeptiert werden. Er warnte ferner, dass die Innovation im Bereich Agro-Tech, die den Wasserverbrauch und die Landnutzung minimiert und gleichzeitig den Ernteertrag steigert, in einer sich ändernden Welt von Bedeutung ist.

Er sagte, dass die Gentechnologie der Pflanzenzüchtung zahlreiche Vorteile bringt. Zum Beispiel könnten die Forscher durch die Erzeugung allergenfreier Lebensmittel enorme Modifikationen für Menschen entwickeln, die von lebensbedrohlichen Allergien betroffen sind. Hauptziel ist es, das langwierige und sehr teure Zulassungssystem für die Industrie zu vergeben und außergewöhnlichen wissenschaftlichen Fortschritt in der Europäischen Union zu ermöglichen. Einzelbewertungen sollten im Gegensatz zu maßgeblichen Definitionen dazu beitragen, dass neue Technologien in die Branche gelangen.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at 
consumerchoicecenter.org

NOBL Completes Series A Funding Round At Davos, Altitude Investment Management Among Round Participants

Cannabis data and consulting company NOBL said Thursday it finalized its Series A fundraise at Davos and capital support of £1.25 million ($1.64 million).

Altitude Investment Management, Enexis AB and Artemis Growth Partners are some of the dominant cannabis investors who have supported the round.

Closing our Series A with the caliber of investors we’ve brought in is indicative of our performance and reputation. We are proven to understand global markets, launch sector leading brands and operate tenacious companies that deliver month on month revenue growth” Co-Founder, Stephen Murphy, said in a statement at NOBL’s co-hosted Cannabis Conclave event in Davos.

NOBL offers a portfolio platform that contains some of the leading companies and brands in the industry, such as Atalis, European Cannabis Weeks, Prohibition Partners, NOBL Live and Cannabis Europa.

“We will continue to invest in talent and innovation while also enabling our operating companies to make smarter and more effective business decisions that will shape the future of the global cannabis industry in a meaningful and impactful way,” Murphy said.

Michael Goldberg, Partner at Altitude Investment Management, stated, “We have been collaborating with the team at NOBL over the last two years and are pleased to invest in this financing round as NOBL continues to shape the future of global cannabis through knowledge and intelligence with its superior data, insights, and networking opportunities.”

How a coronavirus epidemic in China could ripple through the global economy

An international outbreak of respiratory illness sparked by a novel coronavirus has spread from its origins in central China to at least 11 countries, with more than 1,200 confirmed cases — including a presumed case in Canada — and over 40 deaths.

Like previous outbreaks, including the SARS virus 17 years ago, the flu-like disease poses a risk to economies around the world as fear and confusion lead to abrupt changes in behaviour, decreased economic activity and a ripple effect across sectors that threatens everything from productivity to consumer prices.

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome pandemic of 2003 cost the Chinese economy up to US$20 billion, according to the Asian Development Bank, as travel warnings and transit shutdowns discouraged consumption, foreign tourists stayed away and local residents stopped going out.

“The travel and tourism sectors were most obviously hit, although that ripples through the entire economy,” said Richard Smith, a professor of health economics at the University of Exeter Medical School.

“But many effects are short-lived during an outbreak as once the panic is over people go back to business as usual.”

Chinese authorities clamped down on mass transit during the SARS outbreak, hampering commutes, shopping runs and social outings. The national securities regulatory commission closed stock and futures markets in Shanghai and Shenzhen for two weeks to prevent viral transmission. And Beijing ordered movie theatres, internet cafes and other venues to shut down temporarily while hotels, conference centres, restaurants and galleries saw visitors almost disappear completely.

China’s response to the current crisis appears to be swifter, and the disease less virulent, but the country now boasts a far more extensive high-speed rail network than it did in 2003, and its economy is six times larger, upping the risk of transmission and the repercussions of an epidemic.

“China is the engine of the global economy, churning out goods,” said German health economist Fred Roeder.

Its critical role in international shipping may be thrown into disarray as authorities begin to hold back some ships from entering the port at Wuhan, a key hub on the Yangtze River.

“If they cannot leave it creates huge delays in the supply chain and value chain of businesses all across the world,” Roeder said. “It could actually hit the latest generation of smartphone if ports are shutting down.”

Manufacturing could also feel the crunch as supply chains stall, he said.

Roeder has felt firsthand the disruptive power of a pandemic. In the summer of 2003 the teenage Berliner was eagerly gearing up for a United Nations youth conference that would take him to Taipei, but the event was cancelled a few days beforehand due to SARS.

The epidemic also sparked layoffs and time away from work. At one point Singapore Airlines asked its 6,600 cabin crew to take unpaid leave. Children stayed home from school, prompting more parents to shirk their job duties and further reducing productivity, said AltaCorp Capital analyst Chris Murray.

“I was losing guys left, right and centre as people were quarantined,” recalled Murray, based in Toronto — the epicentre of the SARS pandemic outside of Asia. The disease infected 438 Canadians in total and caused 44 deaths in the Toronto area.

The economic damage culminated with World Health Organization’s one-week travel advisory for the city in April 2003, costing the Canadian economy an estimated $5.25 billion that year.

The outbreak of H1N1, or swine flu, in 2009 also sparked work “dislocations,” Murray said. “It went from, ‘Maybe it’ll be okay,’ to sheer panic.”

Freelancers and gig economy workers such as musicians or ride-hail drivers may feel the pinch more acutely, since they can’t rely on a steady wage when demand shrinks.

“It’s something that unfortunately has happened before in a similar way and it tends to affect areas like retail,” said Carolyn Wilkins, senior deputy governor of the Bank of Canada, said this week.

“People don’t go out, they don’t fly in planes, they don’t do as much tourism to the affected areas,” she said.

The fallout makes workers ranging from servers to wholesale bakers to non-unionized hotel staff more vulnerable. Meanwhile spending or investment plans by larger companies may have to be delayed, said Roeder.

It is not clear how lethal the new coronavirus is or even whether it is as dangerous as the ordinary flu, which kills about 3,500 people every year in Canada alone.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at 
consumerchoicecenter.org

Davos 2020 Cannabis Conclave: Uncovering The Future Of The European Market

Medical cannabis in Europe has slowly been gaining traction, but there are still a number of hurdles around regulation that has a lot of catching up to do.

Speaking at the Cannabis Conclave event in Davos, Switzerland last week, Stephen Murphy of Prohibition Partners discussed medical cannabis policy and the importance of knowledge sharing across the continent.

Murphy said big brands have yet to enter the cannabis market, so less competition exists compared to other industries. The market correction offers a window of opportunity for new brands, businesses and ideas to be generated. He stressed cannabis covers numerous industries such as beverages, food, healthcare, beauty, wellness, construction, textiles, engineering, technology, pet care, biofuel and bedding.

“When we first started monitoring and identifying what’s happening in the cannabis space, there were five to six legal markets over the three years we have seen that grow,” said Murphy, who noted the CDB market in particular is really taking off.

“There are hundreds of thousands of people using medical cannabis across the world and we have significant evidence already in place that it justifies the implementation of legislation,” he said.

“I think we can put phases in place in terms of access levels to cannabis. The implication of medical cannabis’ availability in Israel and Canada when there are patients in the UK desperately trying to get access and cannot because ‘there is not enough data’ is very skewed thinking.”

Murphy said we have started to see a lot of pressure on regulatory bodies all of which have bills, policies and motions around cannabis. There are also major opportunities in R&D and there is a huge knowledge gap that needs to be filled.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at 
consumerchoicecenter.org

Cannabis Industry Gathers In Davos: ‘No Silver Bullet Gets Rid Of An Illegal Product’

Cannabis Industry Gathers In Davos: 'No Silver Bullet Gets Rid Of An Illegal Product'

The World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, took place this week and alongside the main event there was a cluster of small cozy cannabis gatherings hosted in the Alps.

Switzerland is one of my favorite countries for a business trip and this week I experienced the ultimate luxury which involved sipping champagne and discussing pot – and the vibe was very much on point.

Business leaders, financial heavyweights and leading politicians from all over the world gathered to discuss key issues revolving around climate change and sustainable business. It’s estimated around 119 billionaires and 53 heads of state attended this year.

The Cannabis Conclave was a huge hit the previous year – an event hosted by David Clement from the Consumer Choice Center. The event was well attended by hedge fund managers and regulators, attracting crowds from Canada, Switzerland, Europe, Israel and China. Many discussions centered around the rapidly growing cannabis industry and how conservative countries are also adopting the recreational drug.

Canada was the second country, after Uruguay, to make cannabis federally legal and as a result took a cautious and in some times instances took a limited approach that has stifled both product availability as well as distribution chains.

What Can We Learn From Canada?

One Canadian government official at Davos who asked to remain anonymous explained: “Our federal government downloaded key aspects to provincial and municipal counterparts that created a disparate and disconnected set of frameworks creating confusion and a wide variety of structures across the country.”

He explained there has been clear winners such as Alberta that has a robust retail and production framework while Ontario has continually been lambasted for a slow and painful rollout that has reduced the success of legalization in the key market in the country.

“As a result we have clear winners and losers and there is much to learn from our experience. As the frameworks and mis-steps are remedied as like any new industry there will be meaningful lessons to be learned,” he explained.

He went on to add no country charting new ground has everything right and in some ways the black market has remained as vibrant as ever whose diminishment was the core cause.

“No silver bullet gets rid of an illegal product, but only meaningful policy that suits the customer and their wallet is effective and the correct approach, market forces should be listened to,” he said.

The Hurdles Of Cannabis

Over champagne, the official added a meaningful lesson for America is to ensure there are no disconnects between states and the federal government that currently persist that has limited proper regulation across the country and in particular created technical and practical problems for the legal industry that continues to give breath and vibrancy to the illicit market.

Stephen Murphy, co-founder of NOBL, highlighted the cannabis plant remains a great unknown with only 3% of the plant meaningfully studied. He stressed there is huge potential of the remaining 97% from a health, economic and social perspective.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at 
consumerchoicecenter.org

Pot Industry Heads to Davos as Stocks Rebound: Cannabis Weekly

Tough times in the cannabis industry aren’t stopping its leaders from going to Davos.

For the second year in a row, there will be a Cannabis House in Davos, Switzerland this week alongside the schmoozing and speeches of the World Economic Forum. The 2020 offering promises to be “a little more formal and more professional” than last year’s, according to Jason Paltrowitz, executive vice president of corporate services at OTC Markets Group, one of the sponsors of the Cannabis House.

Cannabis House will feature a two-day conference focused on the themes of Davos 2020, including sustainability, climate change, social equity and impact investing.

The rout in pot stocks hasn’t dampened interest in the event, which will also include “a professional capital markets discussion,” Paltrowitz said.

The agenda has an international flavor, with speakers from Israel, Switzerland and Asia.

The goal is to get delegates from the World Economic Forum to pop in and learn about the industry, said Richard Carleton, chief executive officer of the Canadian Securities Exchange, another sponsor.

“What was particularly interesting to me last year was how many European institutional investors, everybody from family office managers, hedge funds, right up to some of the largest pension funds in the world” stopped by Cannabis House, Carleton said. “They hadn’t invested yet but were there to learn.”

Stock Rebound

Investors seemed to be in the mood to celebrate successes rather than punish failures last week.

Pot stocks ended the week significantly higher, with the BI Global Cannabis Competitive Peers Index up 15% and the Canadian-focused Horizons Marijuana Life Sciences Index ETF adding 18%, its biggest weekly increase since August 2018. The gains came despite Aphria Inc.’s earnings miss and cut to its full-year guidance, which sent its shares down 8.6% on Tuesday.

Instead, investors focused on positive results from Aphria’s smaller competitor Organigram Holdings Inc. Organigram’s U.S.-traded shares surged 45% Wednesday after it reported positive adjusted Ebitda and revenue that beat the highest analyst estimate. That sent the entire sector rallying, and even Aphria’s shares ended the week higher.

Given how fast investors have been to punish missteps in recent months, could this be a sign that the sector has bottomed out?

There are positive signs in the capital markets too, according to data from Viridian Capital Advisors. In the first two weeks of 2020, seven capital raises worth a total of $250 million were completed. Although the number of deals was lower than the 15 done in the first two weeks of 2019, the average deal size was more than 2.5 times bigger than the same period of last year, Viridian said.

Events This Week

MONDAY 1/20

  • Cannabis House hosts “a global cannabis conversation” in Davos, Switzerland alongside the World Economic Forum, through Jan. 21
  • U.S. markets closed for Martin Luther King Jr. Day

WEDNESDAY 1/22

  • CannaWest addresses regulatory issues in the industry; the event runs in Los Angeles through Jan. 24

THURSDAY 1/23


Originally published here.

Het rebelse kantje van Davos

Cannabis, blockchain, gaming: in het ‘officiële’ programma van het World Economic Forum kom je die zaken niet snel tegen. Maar Davos heeft ook een scherper, meer gedurfd randje.

Originally published here.

Autorisation de médicaments: les consommateurs ont droit à la transparence

Dans le cadre des débats en deuxième lecture sur le Projet de loi de financement de la Sécurité sociale, un amendement à l’Assemblée nationale demande aux entreprises pharmaceutiques de dévoiler, au moment de la fixation du prix du médicament, les investissements publics en R&D dont ils ont bénéficié.

Pour les consommateurs, une transparence de plus grande valeur serait d’illuminer le processus d’autorisation de mise sur le marché (AMM), géré par L’Agence nationale de sécurité du médicament et des produits de santé (ANSM).

Chaque année, l’ANSM à peu près mille médicaments pour utilisation en France, dont ceux à travers la reconnaissance mutuelle de l’Union européenne. Cela comprend à la fois les plus récents médicaments brevetés et les médicaments génériques à moindre coût. L’approche obscure et désuète en matière de brevets et d’approbation réglementaire laisse les patients dans l’ignorance sur les innovations sur le marché. Beaucoup de maladies déjà guérissable se trouvent dans ce processus d’approbation: en le rendant transparent, nous pouvons accélérer la bureaucratie.

Les restrictions en France dans la matière de la transparence administrative se contraste fortement avec la tendance internationale qui consiste à promouvoir une plus grande transparence sur les marchés pharmaceutiques.

Alors que l’Agence européenne des médicaments de l’UE a mis en place un tel mécanisme de notification instantané pour certains médicaments innovants et orphelins pour des patients et les professionnels du métier, la France ne dispose pas d’un système de notification. Un Etat ouvert et transparent devrait fournir aux patients, aux médecins et aux pharmaciens les informations sur les médicaments pour lesquels les fabricants déposent actuellement des demandes d’autorisation de mise sur le marché. Les patients ont non seulement besoin de cette information, mais ils la méritent.

Comment est-ce possible qu’il est plus facile de trouver des chiffres sur l’absentéisme au sein de l’ANSM que de s’informer sur la pipeline actuel des demandes et des approbations? Ne devrions-nous pas avoir accès à cette information ? Comme citoyens, consommateurs, et patients, n’est-il pas désirable de savoir quels médicaments innovants n’ont pas encore accès au marché français ?

Nous devrions suivre les meilleures pratiques internationales et diffuser publiquement plus d’information sur les médicaments dont l’approbation est envisagée. Cela devrait comprendre des renseignements sur le statut de brevet de ces médicaments et sur le calendrier d’approbation. Le Canada offre un bon exemple.

Le Règlement sur les médicaments brevetés du Canada permet la publication de cette information en temps opportun et tient les patients mieux informés des options qui s’offrent à eux en matière de soins de santé. Il aide également à tenir le gouvernement responsable, ce qui mène à un processus d’approbation des médicaments plus transparent et plus fonctionnel.

De nombreux pays avancés, dont Singapour, ont des systèmes ouverts dans lesquels les gouvernements examinent de manière transparente et efficace le statut des brevets des nouveaux médicaments avant l’approbation de leur mise sur le marché. Cette transparence permet aux marchés de mieux fonctionner et de réduire les coûts et les prix. 

Une transparence favorable aux patients est nécessaires non seulement en France, mais aussi dans d’autres pays de l’UE, qui ne disposent pas d’une base de données facile d’accès qui répertorie tous les médicaments approuvés et les médicaments en cours d’examen dans le pays respectif. Les patients méritent un meilleur accès gratuit à ces informations.

Une plus grande transparence des informations sur les brevets et l’approbation réglementaire aide les patients de plusieurs façons. Elle peut contribuer à renforcer les protections de la propriété intellectuelle essentielles à la mise sur le marché des médicaments les plus récents et les plus efficaces. Elle peut également contribuer à accélérer le processus d’approbation des médicaments génériques à moindre coût qui pourraient immédiatement sauver des vies.

Les patients devraient exiger la mise en place d’une base de données en ligne qui non seulement énumère les médicaments brevetés et génériques actuellement approuvés, mais qui montre également en temps réel quelles autorisations de mise sur le marché sont demandées par les médicaments brevetés et non brevetés. Idéalement, les fabricants de médicaments devraient également demander une autorisation de mise en marché en France par le biais de cette plateforme ouverte. Cela permettrait d’offrir un guichet unique aux patients, aux professionnels de la santé et à l’industrie pharmaceutique. 

À l’ère d’Amazon, de TripAdvisor et d’Ocado, il est temps que notre administration publique contribue à apporter plus de transparence et de données en direct aux patients et aux médecins. Tout retard dans notre système de santé signifie que les patients sont traités plus mal qu’ils ne pourraient l’être. Et nous méritons mieux.

Originally published here.


The Consumer Choice Center is the consumer advocacy group supporting lifestyle freedom, innovation, privacy, science, and consumer choice. The main policy areas we focus on are digital, mobility, lifestyle & consumer goods, and health & science.

The CCC represents consumers in over 100 countries across the globe. We closely monitor regulatory trends in Ottawa, Washington, Brussels, Geneva and other hotspots of regulation and inform and activate consumers to fight for #ConsumerChoice. Learn more at 
consumerchoicecenter.org

Scroll to top